Posts Tagged ‘Israel grossman Information’

Action On Guantanamo Will Likely Wait Until After Congresss’ Summer Recess

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 29 2015

Congressional Republicans have demanded the White House send them a plan for closing the lockup at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. President Obama’s top counterterrorism adviser recently outlined such a plan.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427318480/action-on-guantanamo-will-likely-wait-until-after-congresss-summer-recess?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Imprisoned Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard To Be Paroled In November

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 29 2015

Israelis support the release of convicted spy Jonathan Pollard from a U.S. jail. He was arrested in 1985 and charged with passing secrets to Israel. Steve Inskeep talks to reporter Daniel Estrin.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427318508/imprisoned-israeli-spy-jonathan-pollard-to-be-paroled-in-november?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

South Koreans Bristle At Growing Dominance Of Family-Run Conglomerates

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 29 2015

A small number of family-run conglomerates dominate South Korea’s economy. The biggest started as a village store in 1938. It’s controlled by the same family, and is now a household name: Samsung.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427318529/south-koreans-bristle-at-growing-dominance-of-family-run-conglomerates?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

How Finns Make Sports Part Of Everyday Life

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 28 2015

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The sporting options in Finland are everywhere. Here, two people take advantage of the ice on Lake Hiidenvesi to get some exercise.

The sporting options in Finland are everywhere. Here, two people take advantage of the ice on Lake Hiidenvesi to get some exercise.



Sami Uskela/Flickr

In Helsinki, sports facilities pop up all over the place, sometimes in some pretty odd nooks and crannies. One bomb shelter hosts an archery club, another an underground swimming pool and an ice hockey rink.

Though they hardly need it, there’s a national plan in Finland to get people to sit less. It reminds them, in fact, that “Under the Constitution … physical activity is a basic cultural right.”

“It’s been kind of a social right to provide citizens with sporting possibilities,” says Hanna Vehmas, a sports scientist at the University of Jyväskylä. She says it’s a Nordic thing to consider sports a social right. That thinking started in the 1970s, when governments started subsidizing sports gyms in even the smallest towns.

Now, she says, “there’s an estimate of some close to 30,000 sports facilities in this country, which is said to be more per capita than in any other country in the world.”

Those facilities are one reason why Finland and its Nordic neighbors always make the top five list of most physically active European countries, according to surveys by the European Commission. These days, municipalities spend about $700 million a year subsidizing sports facilities and clubs. A portion of lottery funds also goes toward funding sports facilities and research.

Walkways and bike paths snake through the cities. Public swimming pools are busy year round, even above the Arctic Circle. And during the cold, dark winters, cross-country skiers cut tracks in the snow through parks, across the solid lakes, even on the frozen Baltic Sea.

“Here you can more or less just step out of your door and go,” Vehmas says.

Finns do just that. Half of women, and a third of men, say they bike to work. About a fifth of the country belong to sports clubs or federations. Some of them even play sports at work.

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A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.

Rae Ellen Bichell for NPR


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Rae Ellen Bichell for NPR

A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.

A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.

Rae Ellen Bichell for NPR

A poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found there’s a gender gap when it comes to sports in adulthood in the U.S. Men are more than twice as likely as women (35 percent to 16 percent) to say they play sports.

Every Wednesday morning, a group of scientists at the Finnish Meteorological Institute and the University of Helsinki ditch their desks to play “futsal,” an indoor form of soccer, in a gym across the street. It’s one of the most popular team sports in the country, along with floor hockey and Finnish baseball.

The bosses of these meteorologists and computer scientists encourage them to play sports on the clock for an hour a week.

“My own boss plays badminton, floorball, and futsal. And his boss also plays futsal,” says Mika Heiskanen of the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

When it comes to employee fitness, these employers are hardly exceptional in Finland. The postal service has orienteering and riflery teams. A nearby chocolate factory has a gym and offers aerobics classes. And, Heiskanen says, he and his teammates regularly take on other government agencies, like customs officials and police units.

Ossi Aura, who specializes in occupational health care at the health care company Terveystalo, says the trend of employers encouraging sports participation started about a century ago with the forestry industry.

“Nowadays, 90 percent of employers support their employees’ physical activity in some way,” he explains.

Each year, Finnish employers spend an average of about 200 euros per employee for physical activity, or about $220. The money goes to anything from gym vouchers, to providing workout facilities and saunas. Even factories offer such services.

Yes, in fact they have their locker rooms, they have their showers, they have their saunas, based on the ancient agreements between workers’ unions,” says Aura.

Today, one reason employers tend to support their employees’ physical activity is because of a tax break. Businesses can deduct money spent on employees’ physical wellbeing, which includes promoting sports and exercise.

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A man bikes past the Central Station in downtown Helsinki.

Franck Guiziou/Hemis/Corbis


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Franck Guiziou/Hemis/Corbis

A man bikes past the Central Station in downtown Helsinki.

A man bikes past the Central Station in downtown Helsinki.

Franck Guiziou/Hemis/Corbis

But there’s something else. “We have a lot of research showing that investing in work well-being will bring back as much as six times” the money invested, says Matleena Livson of the Finnish Sports Confederation. “Because you reduce sick leaves, you improve the cohesiveness and good spirit, and you improve employer image at the workplace.”

Livson and Aura say it’s understood in Finland and other Nordic countries that healthy employees do better work. They also don’t have as many sick days. And staying fit, especially by playing sports together, could help build company cohesion and loyalty. “And that’s actually even more important than the health side,” says Aura.

Physically active people also save the healthcare system a lot of money. According to a calculator devised by the World Health Organization, the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs Health estimates that people who bike and walk save the health care system as much as 5 billion euros, or about $5.5 billion, each year.

But state subsidies are now being cut in Finland. Hanna Vehmas says sports funding is taking a hit. “The private sector has become more responsible for providing sports supply,” says the University of Jyväskylä’s Vehmas. “Sports participation is more than before becoming a commodity, something that you need to buy. And then people can afford it or they cannot afford it.”

Our Sports and Health series continues over the summer, based on the results of our poll with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/07/28/426748088/how-finns-make-sports-part-of-everyday-life?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Same-Sex Couples Strive For Marriage Rights In Every EU Country

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 28 2015

The European Union has standards for labor, trade and sanitation, but same-sex marriage is left to member states. Only about a dozen EU countries recognize such unions.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/28/427018666/same-sex-couples-strive-for-marriage-rights-in-every-eu-country?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Immigration Changes Create Refugee Crisis Along Dominican Republic-Haiti Border

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 28 2015

Refugee camps are appearing along Haiti’s border with the Dominican Republic as people flee the DR to comply with new immigration laws. It’s unclear how the Haitian government will manage the crisis.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/28/427019702/immigration-changes-create-refugee-crisis-along-dominican-republic-haiti-border?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Moderate Muslims Counter Islamic State Propaganda With Own Media Strategy

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 27 2015

Imam Omar Atia (left) and Zac Parsons discuss Islam’s teachings in effort to combat what they see as misinformation being spread about the religion.

U.S. officials are concerned about the recruiting efforts of the self-proclaimed Islamic State, also known as ISIS, as the group has stepped up its online outreach.

One team in Southwestern Indiana who opposes the radical Islamist group is taking to the web to reclaim the message of Islam.

Dozens of four-minute web episodes, targeting young people with questions about Islam and its relationship to violence, are being released by Reclamation Studios.

In one episode, Zac Parsons is walking side-by-side with Imam Omar Atia, on a sunny day in Evansville, Ind., asking him a question about Islam:

“You’re a Muslim guy, a peaceful guy and yet, you know, we see all this stuff in the news all the time about, you know, terrorism and violence and killing, you know, in the name of Islam — which is supposed to be a religion of peace. How is it that for them it’s not peaceful, but for you it is?”

“It’s not even left for question,” Atia says. “Unjust killing is completely forbidden.”

The video, “Does Islam Encourage Violence?” is simply an interaction between Parsons and Atia, the leader of the Islamic Society of Evansville.

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Atia, co-founder of Reclamation Studios’ initiative, wants to try to dispel the image here that Islam is a foreign religion that forces believers to choose between nation and faith.

“There’s still this identity crisis that a lot of Muslim-Americans live, unfortunately,” Atia says, “because right now, still, the concept that Islam is a foreign faith to America.”

Parsons, a digital marketer, says these videos try to be engaging enough to reach younger viewers.

“Unfortunately, ISIS is doing a great job of creating that really compelling ‘this is something you can do to change the world,’ ” he says, “And we hope that we’re able to use some of those same ideas and technology to say ‘no, this is actually what the religion of Islam teaches.’ “

Nour Shams, who works on Reclamation Studios’ website from Egypt, says it’s important to get this information across as directly as possible.

“They can ask us questions, we can do consultations, we can give them further answers for any questions that they have,” she says. “We can even host people and just have everything transparent in front of the camera, and listen to people and answer their questions.”

Richard Maass, who researches international security at the University of Evansville, says the Islamic State has been successful at targeting isolated people who have little or no knowledge of Islam.

“So the more initiatives like this one that openly refute ISIS ideology, especially online — and especially through live communications with people online — the more difficult it will be for ISIS to monopolize the perceptions of those vulnerable individuals,” he says.

There are now more than a dozen people working on this project; the goal is to produce 70 web episodes, all in an effort to help counter what they see as misinformation about Islam.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/27/424961326/moderate-muslims-counter-islamic-state-propaganda-with-own-media-strategy?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Obama Talks Candidly About Flaws In Kenya’s Society

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 27 2015

On a trip to Kenya, a first for a sitting president, Barack Obama took advantage of his heritage. The first Kenyan-American president wrestled with tension between his office and family obligations.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/27/426674302/obama-talks-candidly-about-flaws-in-kenyas-society?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

After Court Ruling, 3 Immigration Detention Centers Could Close

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 27 2015

Thousands of Central American families claiming asylum in the U.S. have been detained. A federal district court judge ruled that 3 facilities that hold these families aren’t meeting legal standards.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/27/426674309/after-court-ruling-3-immigration-detention-centers-could-close?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Britain’s Pearson In Talks To Sell Stake In The Economist Group

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 26 2015

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Georg Kapsch, President of the Federation of Austrian Industry, holds an issue of The Economist during a news conference in Vienna last year. Britain’s Pearson PLC says it’s in talks to sell its 50 percent share in The Economist Group.

Heinz-Peter Bader/Reuters/Landov


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Heinz-Peter Bader/Reuters/Landov

Georg Kapsch, President of the Federation of Austrian Industry, holds an issue of The Economist during a news conference in Vienna last year. Britain's Pearson PLC says it's in talks to sell its 50 percent share in The Economist Group.

Georg Kapsch, President of the Federation of Austrian Industry, holds an issue of The Economist during a news conference in Vienna last year. Britain’s Pearson PLC says it’s in talks to sell its 50 percent share in The Economist Group.

Heinz-Peter Bader/Reuters/Landov

Updated at 1:15 p.m. ET

Britain’s Pearson PLC — just days after announcing it would sell The Financial Times — has made public that it is engaged in talks to dump its 50 percent stake in The Economist Group.

“Pearson confirms it is in discussions with The Economist Group Board and trustees regarding the potential sale of our 50 percent share in the group,” the company said in a statement on Saturday. “There is no certainty that this process will lead to a transaction.”

Reuters reports that Italian holding company Exor, which now has a 4.72 percent stake in The Economist Group, is in talks with Pearson to increase its share.

The venerable Economist, a weekly news magazine that calls itself a newspaper, is known for its cogent analysis of international affairs and a wry wit.

Politico reports:

“Existing Economist shareholders led by John Elkann, heir to the Italian Agnelli industrial fortune and a member of the magazine’s board, are working on a potential buyout of Pearson’s stake, according to people familiar with the talks.

“Mr. Elkann was not immediately available for comment, an aide said.

“Sources said that Pearson could get as much as £500 million for its stake, although the price is subject to ongoing negotiations.”

The Wall Street Journal adds:

“The publisher makes most of its revenue from educational services underpinned by its operations in North America. It has a 50% non-controlling stake in The Economist Group which publishes The Economist, a weekly business and international news publication with a paid circulation of 1.6 million.

“The group’s businesses include data research firm Economist Intelligence Unit as well as other related assets such as The Economist Events and The Economist Corporate Network.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/07/25/426202627/britains-pearson-in-talks-to-sell-stake-in-the-economist-group?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world