Posts Tagged ‘Israel grossman attorney Information’

Thousands March In Moscow In Memory of Murdered Opposition Figure Boris Nemtsov

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Mar 02 2015

Copyright © 2015 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Tens of thousands of people marched in Moscow today to remember one of President Putin’s staunchest critics, who was gunned down on Friday night. The procession to mourn Boris Nemtsov was one of the biggest in the city since the anti-government demonstrations began in 2011. NPR’s Corey Flintoff has this report.

(SOUNDBITE OF HELICOPTER PROPELLER)

COREY FLINTOFF, BYLINE: The mass of people passed by some of the most potent symbols of the Russian state, including the Kremlin Towers. Some carried signs saying I Am Not Afraid.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Speaking Russian).

FLINTOFF: Opposition groups provided hundreds of Russian flags, each one with a strip of black ribbon in sign of mourning for one of their most outspoken and charismatic figures.

ANTON ROMANENKO: I would say, first of all, that he was a very good human being. I would say that he was very bright figure and a very good politician.

FLINTOFF: That’s university student Anton Romanenko, who says he particularly admired the 55-year-old leader for exposing corruption among government officials. Nemtsov’s corruption accusations extended as high as President Vladimir Putin. He published a pamphlet last year detailing what he said was Putin’s unaccounted-for personal wealth, including estates and palatial homes.

If Putin felt enmity, he’s been careful not to show it in the past two days. He issued a statement condemning the crime and saying that he would personally oversee the investigation.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD)

UNIDENTIFIED PEOPLE: (Speaking Russian).

FLINTOFF: One of Nemtsov’s closest allies called it a political murder, aimed at scaring those who don’t agree with the government. Sergei Belagorov, a physicist, says Nemtsov’s death is an especially painful loss for people like him who remember Nemtsov’s rise in the 1990s, when there was much more political freedom.

SERGEI BELAGOROV: Because, for me – I’m about 44 – the atmosphere is already quite bad. I can imagine that for younger people, there is still some hope.

FLINTOFF: There were many younger people in today’s procession, but it’s not clear whether they feel hope or whether that hope will translate into activism. Corey Flintoff, NPR News, Moscow.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR’s prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/03/01/390033523/thousands-march-in-moscow-in-memory-of-murdered-opposition-figure-boris-nemtsov?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

How Is Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s Washington Visit Playing In Israel?

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Mar 02 2015

Copyright © 2015 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said today he will be representing all Israelis and all Jewish people when he speaks before Congress this Tuesday, at the invitation of congressional Republicans. Netanyahu spoke just before boarding plane to Washington, and U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, who is a Democrat and Jewish, was asked about his comments on CNN.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, “STATE OF THE UNION”)

DIANNE FEINSTEIN: He doesn’t speak for me on this. He doesn’t at all speak…

DANA BASH: Does that bother you when he says he speaks for all the Jews?

FEINSTEIN: Yeah, I think it’s a rather arrogant statement.

RATH: That should give you a sense of the political controversy here in the U.S. But how is Netanyahu’s visit playing in Israel? To talk about that, we’ve reached NPR’s Emily Harris. She’s on the line from Jerusalem. And, Emily, there’s been a lot of controversy over how this invitation happened, but there are real disagreements between Netanyahu and the White House on Iran. How controversial is the speech among Israelis?

EMILY HARRIS, BYLINE: You know, it’s been quite controversial here, as well, ever since it was announced – and not because of Iran or Netanyahu’s stance against Iran, but because of this relationship with the White House and the heightened tensions now between Israel and Israel’s superpower backer and closest ally. Today, when Netanyahu left Tel Aviv for Washington, he comments seemed designed in a way to try to communicate that he’s above the fray – talking about his trip as crucial and historic and casting it in sort of the existential debate about Israel’s future. This is a way that some analysts have said that Netanyahu likes to portray himself.

RATH: So what kind of criticism and what kind of support are you seeing from Mr. Netanyahu in Israel?

HARRIS: Well, Iran is seen as a very real threat here to Israelis across the board, so there’s a large degree of general support for him taking a strong stance and pushing for a deal that would somehow guarantee that the paths to a nuclear weapon would truly be closed to Iran. But that rift with the White House is deeply concerning, also, to Israelis. Israelis – a lot of them say they’re concerned about alienating Israel’s closest ally. And they say that this kind of agreement could have been done quietly and perhaps been more effective.

And there’s worry that support for Israel will become a partisan issue in Congress, rather than the bipartisan issue it’s been for a long time to. There’s been some specific criticism from former top security officials. Over a hundred of them called on Netanyahu to cancel the speech – doing that today. They’re saying that Israel’s enemy is Iran, not Washington, and this rift is actually making Israel strategically weaker. And, of course, there’s been criticism from Netanyahu’s political rivals, especially Labor Party leader Yitzhak Herzog, who’s trying to unseat Netanyahu in parliamentary elections that are coming up.

RATH: And how is this going to play in those elections? How is the controversy going to play out, then?

HARRIS: Well, you know, it’s not really clear. I mean, like I said, Iran is a worry for many Israelis. A lot of voters have told me that they think that any Israeli leader would do the right thing when it came time to deal with Iran – whatever that right thing was – but looking out for Israel’s interests. But it will play a role in the election because of this concern over the relationship with the U.S. And it actually plays a role in a very practical level. The speech will be aired live here in Israel, but it will be time-delayed, and election officials will be watching. If it seems like he’s electioneering back to the voters at home, the speech, you know, could potentially be stopped.

RATH: That’s NPR’s Emily Harris in Jerusalem. Emily, thank you.

HARRIS: Thanks a lot.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR’s prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/03/01/390033516/how-is-israeli-prime-minister-netanyahus-washington-visit-playing-in-israel?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

London’s Homeless Line Up For Free Meals From Mobile Sikh Kitchen

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Mar 02 2015

Copyright © 2015 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

A tradition from the Sikh faith has expanded beyond the temple walls and into the streets of London. It’s called langar. Surinder Singh Purewal is a senior member of the largest Sikh temple outside of India. It’s in the London suburb of Southall.

SURINDER SINGH PUREWAL: Everybody is welcome to the free kitchen, which is what we call langar, where they are served a free meal.

RATH: The Sikh temple or gurdwara isn’t like its counterparts in the world’s other big religions. The gurdwara is actually nondenominational. Anybody can come to worship whatever they want. Atheists can just go and hang out. The langar is for anyone who wants to eat.

But it’s not like that’s common knowledge, so generally it’s all Sikhs eating the free meal at the gurdwara. Now, several years ago, after the economy took a hit, Indian students going to school in London started coming out to the suburbs for the langar.

PUREWAL: Because they were going to colleges, there were other students from other nationalities who started to come with them. And then obviously the word got around, and the other people started to come.

RATH: And as word spread that everyone was welcome, the meal service there grew and grew.

PUREWAL: It’s about 5000 a day, and at the weekend, it’s about 10,000.

RATH: That’s when Randeep Singh, a young member of the temple, got an idea.

RANDEEP SINGH: Sikh temples – although in our local Asian areas there’s quite a few of them dotted around – but if you go into central London, there’s no Sikh temple. So how do we help the people that can’t get to the temples? We then decided to take our work into the wider audience – into central London – and to feed the masses.

RATH: Randeep Singh now runs the homeless project for a group called the Sikh Welfare and Awareness Team – SWAT. Think of this as langar meets food truck. SWAT vans head out to the neediest areas of London as mobile kitchens and the people they’re now feeding are entirely non-Sikh.

SINGH: We deal with about 350 – sometimes to 450 – every Sunday night, every Thursday. And we’re planning to start going out every day.

RATH: Back at the temple, a big Sikh congregation keeps the donation box full. But SWAT doesn’t have a donation box or a congregation as such. Still, Singh says the offerings keep coming in.

SINGH: We’re very blessed. I truly believe that God sends everything through his different ways that he does it. We don’t advertise our service. We don’t really shout about what we do. But we do get noticed, because I see the van everywhere. They see people dropping clothes to us and then somebody else will ask what these close are for. And we tell them.

RATH: And their charity is becoming an essential part of day-to-day living for a growing number of London’s poor.

SINGH: I had a lady that came to me and said I had my last 10 pounds, and I had to decide whether I’m going to buy food with it or am I going to buy a token for my electricity. And she said I bought the electricity because I knew you guys are going to be here to feed me.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RATH: That’s Randeep Singh. He runs the homeless project for the Sikh Welfare and Awareness Team.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR’s prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/03/01/390033530/londons-homeless-line-up-for-free-meals-from-mobile-sikh-kitchen?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

While New England Gets Snow, West Africa Gets Sand

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Mar 01 2015

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The Harmattan haze can become so dense in Dakar, Senegal, it dims the sun and grounds flights.

Joe Penney/Reuters /Landov


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Joe Penney/Reuters /Landov

The Harmattan haze can become so dense in Dakar, Senegal, it dims the sun and grounds flights.

The Harmattan haze can become so dense in Dakar, Senegal, it dims the sun and grounds flights.

Joe Penney/Reuters /Landov

Would you kindly bear with me a little while I have a good old moan, please? I’m feeling rather wretched. No, not because I’ve finally kicked a lingering lurgy that turned out to be bronchitis and stole my voice. But because one of the reasons I blame for the illness is back: the Harmattan.

You know that saying about an ill wind? Well, that ill wind is the Harmattan. Seasonal sandy, dust-filled, hot trade winds blow in from the Sahara Desert and sweep across West Africa, including the coastal curve, and directly down my throat and into my lungs and increasingly constricted chest.

OK, ok. That may not be a scientific assessment, but that’s how it feels, so please indulge me.

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The view from the house where the author stays in Accra, Ghana. The buildings in the background are typically bright green and red, but a blanket of Harmattan haze has dulled their colors.

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR


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Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

The view from the house where the author stays in Accra, Ghana. The buildings in the background are typically bright green and red, but a blanket of Harmattan haze has dulled their colors.

The view from the house where the author stays in Accra, Ghana. The buildings in the background are typically bright green and red, but a blanket of Harmattan haze has dulled their colors.

Ofeibea Quist-Arcton/NPR

The Harmattan — a land wind — blows from the northeast and often starts in January (the cool season). It sometimes continues through to March, though winds come and go without much notice.

There’s a Harmattan haze hovering over downtown Dakar that looks all too familiar. The malevolent mantle of dust and sand, that’s threatening to settle, comes after gusty, dusty weather, with winds whistling through the streets of the city center.

It usually carries large amounts of dust, which it transports hundreds of miles out over the Atlantic Ocean. The dust often interferes with aircraft operations and settles on the decks of ships.

The same dust-laden winds that blanketed Accra when I was back home in Ghana last month — and where I fell ill — seem to have followed me across West Africa to Senegal, where majestic and mighty baobab trees and palm trees are sprinkled with a layer of dust.

Pedestrians are covering their mouths and noses with scarves and shawls for protection. And fast food motorbike delivery riders are wearing mouth masks.

Some days, visibility was limited to about 150 yards in Accra, and then the haze would lift and, psychologically, you would feel a little better.

When I was a child, I remember being told “children get sick during the Harmattan season,” so take care and don’t be ill.

This year it’s not only children. On plane journeys, on the street, just about everywhere, I seem to hear adults and kids coughing, like the relentless cough I just couldn’t shake. I’m so sure this lingering seasonal Harmattan, which descends on us, then disappears, is one of the causes of these lurgies.

A Dakar-based pulmonologist told me asthma sufferers get worse during the Harmattan; wheezing, whistling and rattling even more than usual. Keep that pump handy.

And surely it can’t be a coincidence that chest and throat infections seem to be on the rise? Must be all that germ-filled dust we’re gobbling up.

But the Harmattan winds are not only a risk to humans and health. Agriculture is also feeling the effect; regional cocoa trees are suffering. (Yes, the cocoa that produces the chocolate you crave.).

The cocoa crop in Africa’s two top exporters, Ivory Coast and Ghana, has been hit by the Harmattan, we’re told.

Farmers and analysts warn that the worst Harmattan winds in several years may lower output and cut production. As the seasonal gusts blow down from the Sahara, they blanket the cocoa-growing regions in dust, which lowers temperatures and blocks out sunlight.

In Ivory Coast, blossoms and small pods that were visible this time last year are apparently missing from the cocoa trees this season.

And here in Dakar, usually bright blue skies have turned horrid and hazy, with an almost yellowy tinge.

So that’s why I’m feeling rather miffed, because I was hoping we were finished with the Harmattan this year. But the ill-wind looks as if it wants to pester us a little longer.

I read somewhere that the rather lyrical name “Harmattan” originates from the Akan-Twi word haramata, which could possibly come from the Arabic haram, meaning “evil thing.” Evil works for me. Begone!

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/goatsandsoda/2015/02/28/389565935/while-new-england-gets-snow-west-africa-gets-sand-clouds?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Iraq’s National Museum To Open For First Time Since 2003 Invasion

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Mar 01 2015

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A man looks at ancient Assyrian human-headed winged bull statues at the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad on Saturday.

Reuters/Landov


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Reuters/Landov

A man looks at ancient Assyrian human-headed winged bull statues at the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad on Saturday.

A man looks at ancient Assyrian human-headed winged bull statues at the Iraqi National Museum in Baghdad on Saturday.

Reuters/Landov

Days after video emerged showing self-declared Islamic State extremists taking sledge hammers to pre-Islamic antiquities inside the Mosul museum, the Iraqi government has reopened the country’s national museum, shuttered since the 2003 U.S. invasion of the country that toppled Saddam Hussein.

The National Museum’s reopening was moved up as a retort to the move by ISIS in Mosul, which has been almost universally condemned as a most uncivilized act in a part of the world widely considered the cradle of civilization.

“The events in Mosul led us to speed up our work and we wanted to open it today as a response to what the gangs of Daesh did,” Iraq’s Deputy Tourism Minister Qais Hussein Rashid said, using an Arabic acronym for ISIS.

The National Museum, which displays artifacts from the Mesopotamian era, was looted and then closed after the U.S. invasion. Agence France-Presse quotes Rashid as saying that around 4,300 of the roughly 15,000 looted pieces have been recovered in the past 12 years. Authorities are still tracking down more than 10,000 items in markets and auctions.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/28/389779293/iraqs-national-museum-to-open-for-first-time-since-2003-invasion?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Remembering The Relics And Rich History Of Mosul, Before ISIS

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Mar 01 2015

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Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers.

Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images


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Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers.

Then-U.S. ambassador to Iraq Christopher Hill (right) tours the Mosul Museum of History in May 2009. This week the self-declared Islamic State posted a video online that showed militants going through the museum, pushing over statues and smashing artifacts with sledgehammers.

Mujahed Mohammed/AFP/Getty Images

When I visited the Mosul museum in 2010, it was as cool and damp as any tomb. It was winter; the power was out and the lights were off.

But as a State Department visit, escorted by U.S. soldiers, made its way around the gloomy rooms, the enthusiasm of the staff lit up the treasures that gradually became apparent.

The Nineveh plain in northern Iraq, where Mosul is, saw mighty civilizations rise and fall, but their relics endured for millennia. In the museum were depictions of the great winged Assyrian beasts called lamassu. There was a stone tablet that might be the world’s oldest menu: a record of a banquet given by King Ashurbanipal II of Assyria.

I was dwarfed by friezes of giant Assyrian warriors, with vast, muscular bodies and finely sculpted details: the petals of the chamomile flowers, the curls of the beards.

Little, it seems, has been spared. The latest video by the militants of the self-proclaimed Islamic State — though not footage of human slaughter — is also painful to watch. Bearded men take sledgehammers to the artifacts of the museum and go to archaeological sites nearby.

When I visited the remnants of the cities and palaces at Hatra and Nimrud, they were guarded only by a few men living in trailers. They were in rural places, and the main concern was that rain and pigeon droppings were erasing carvings — not that fanatics with power tools would come and wreak destruction.

Despite claims to the contrary, the statues and friezes they destroy are all originals, thousands of years old, said one expert who worked at the museum for 10 years but didn’t want to be identified for fear of ISIS.

“We expected this,” says the former museum worker. “Nobody can do anything … they did what they want.”

When ISIS arrived last summer, the worker says, some of the museum staff — the men — tried to negotiate. They tried to strike a bargain, for example, that ISIS destroy only the tomb said to be that of Jonah, but not the ancient church-turned-mosque built on top. It didn’t work.

In this latest video, an unidentified man says Islam calls for the destruction of all idols. The museum worker was dismissive of this piety, saying the militants “don’t care about the statues” but rather are trying to “send a message to all the world.”

As we walked around the ruins of Hatra five years ago — as the American soldiers snapped photos of themselves next to statues — the museum director, Hicket al-Aswad, told me that most of the city still was unexcavated.

At the time, he wished they could get funding and peace so they could begin exploring the history. As things stand, maybe it’s better it remained underground.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2015/02/28/389582652/remembering-the-relics-and-rich-history-of-mosul-before-isis?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Mexican Attorney General Who Handled Case Of Vanished Students Will Step Down

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Feb 28 2015

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Mexico’s Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam is leaving his post to take a new Cabinet-level job as head of urban and rural development.

Marco Ugarte/AP


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Marco Ugarte/AP

Mexico's Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam is leaving his post to take a new Cabinet-level job as head of urban and rural development.

Mexico’s Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam is leaving his post to take a new Cabinet-level job as head of urban and rural development.

Marco Ugarte/AP

Embattled Mexican Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam will be stepping down. The announcement came Friday after Murillo Karam weathered months of criticism over the way he handled the investigation into the disappearance of 43 college students.

NPR’s Carrie Kahn has reported extensively about the student disappearances, which took place on Sept. 26 of last year, sparked massive protests in Mexico and dealt a blow to the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto.

The investigation, which was widely criticized for missteps and insensitivity toward family members, uncovered a complex network of collusion among local government officials, police and drug cartels. The government says the students, who were en route to a protest in the state of Guerrero, were abducted by corrupt police officers and handed over to drug traffickers, who then burned the students’ bodies and threw their remains into a river.

Carrie reported about one notorious news conference in which Murillo Karam announced that the students had been killed and, after fielding dozens of reporters’ questions, said “that’s enough, I’m tired.” Murillo Karam later said he’d meant to say that the questions where getting repetitive and he was sleep deprived from working the case. But the statement outraged Mexicans and led to a social media campaign called “ya me canse” (“I’m tired”) in which Mexicans expressed their exhaustion over government impunity.

Murillo Karam will move to the Ministry of Agrarian and Urban Development. Senator Arely Gomez, a longtime member the ruling Institutional Party, or PRI, is said to be his replacement.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/27/389530564/mexican-attorney-general-who-handled-case-of-vanished-students-to-step-down?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Putin Critic Boris Nemtsov Shot Dead In Moscow

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Feb 28 2015

On Friday, gunmen shot to death the prominent Russian opposition figure Boris Nemtsov. Nemtsov was a longtime Russian opposition leader and a sharp critic of President Vladimir Putin.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/02/27/389605219/putin-critic-boris-nemtsov-shot-dead-in-moscow?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

After Second Round Of Talks, Cubans, Americans Emerge Upbeat

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Feb 28 2015

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Josefina Vidal, director general of the U.S. division at Cuba’s Foreign Ministry, smiles at the start of the Cuba talks at the State Department in Washington, on Friday.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP


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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Josefina Vidal, director general of the U.S. division at Cuba's Foreign Ministry, smiles at the start of the Cuba talks at the State Department in Washington, on Friday.

Josefina Vidal, director general of the U.S. division at Cuba’s Foreign Ministry, smiles at the start of the Cuba talks at the State Department in Washington, on Friday.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

After a second round of talks, Cuban and American diplomats emerged upbeat about the potential to reestablish diplomatic ties between the long-estranged neighbors.

In a press conference following the talks, Roberta Jacobson, the diplomat leading the talks for the Americans, said: “Today we saw the kind of constructive exchange that advances us toward a more productive diplomatic relationship.”

Her counterpart, Josefina Vidal, who is leading the talks for the Cubans said: “We are confident that there can be civilized relations and coexistence between Cuba and the United States and that we would be able to recognize and respect our difference so that as neighbors we can identify areas of mutual interest to cooperate for the benefit of our two countries, the region and world.”

In diplomatic speak, those are some pretty positive words.

Coming into the meeting, two issues loomed large: Cuba’s demand that the U.S. remove it from the State Department’s State Sponsor of Terrorism list. And the U.S. demand that its diplomats in Havana have complete freedom of mobility, meeting whoever they want, whenever they want.

Vidal said that the U.S. had assured them they were working on reviewing the country’s spot on the terrorism list.

“For Cuba it is a matter of sheer justice,” she said. “Cuba strongly believes that it should have never been included in these limited list of countries and today there is no ground to justify the inclusion of our country on that list.”

But, leaving an opening, she added that the removal of Cuba from the list is a “priority” but not a “precondition” for reopening embassies.

Jacobson said talks took on a “very cooperative spirit” and the two sides made “progress on a number” of issues.

Jacobson said one sign of how well the talks have gone is that right now there are about six other dialogues that are planned or happening. One of those talks, she said, involves opening up telecommunications on the island and the other, which Jacobson called the “most challenging but most important,” is about human rights.

Jacobson added that she thought the U.S. embassy in Havana could be open as early as April, as the Summit of the Americas gets going in Panama.

“I certainly think that with the kind of cooperation that we had today I certainly leave those conversations today optimistic but committed and recognizing the work that still has to be done, but certainly not daunted by the idea that there is a desire to move forward as quickly as we can,” Jacobson said.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2015/02/27/389617790/after-second-round-of-talks-cubans-americans-emerge-upbeat?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

ISIS’s ‘Jihadi John’ Revealed As Londoner Born In Kuwait

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Feb 27 2015

NPR’s Kelly McEvers speaks with Washington Post contributor Souad Mekhennet. The Post broke the news about the identity of “Jihadi John,” the masked man with a British accent who has beheaded several hostages held by the Islamic State and who speaks directly to the camera in ISIS videos. The identity was revealed as Mohammed Emwazi, a Briton from a well-to-do family who grew up in West London and graduated college with a degree in computer programming.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/02/26/389321611/isiss-jihadi-john-revealed-as-londoner-born-in-kuwait?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world