Posts Tagged ‘Israel grossman attorney Information’

Kenny G Deletes Tweet From His Visit To Hong Kong Protesters

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 23 2014

In Hong Kong, saxophone superstar Kenny G has found himself caught between those two sides: pro-democracy protesters and China’s Communist Party.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/23/358238884/kenny-g-deletes-tweet-from-his-visit-to-hong-kong-protesters?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

With Bears On The Streets, Canadian Town Cancels Halloween

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 23 2014

Polar bears have been wandering the streets of Arviat in northern Canada more than usual this season. The town has canceled Halloween in fear of unwelcome trick-or-treaters.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/23/358238989/with-bears-on-the-streets-canadian-town-cancels-halloween?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

How Much Would You Pay For A Putin-Themed Music Box?

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 23 2014

A music box with a figurine of Vladimir Putin is expected to be auctioned in Germany for several million dollars. The box, made by world-renowned puppet maker Christian Bailly, plays a Russian Waltz.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/23/358238962/how-much-would-you-pay-for-a-putin-themed-music-box?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Thieves In Karachi Target Foundation Working For The Destitute

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 22 2014

The Edhi Foundation — synonymous with humanitarian work — was robbed over the weekend in Karachi. Over $1 million was stolen. Pakistanis are shocked that the respected group would be the target of such a crime.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/22/357998983/thieves-in-karachi-target-foundation-working-for-the-destitute?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Among The Young And Privileged In North Korea

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 22 2014


In the summer of 2011, American journalist Suki Kim got a job teaching English at the elite, all-male, Pyongyang University of Science and Technology in the North Korean capital Pyongyang.

Kim, who was born in South Korea and immigrated with her family to the U.S. at age 13, is a fluent Korean speaker and secretly took notes during her six months at the university. This formed the basis for her new book, Without You, There Is No Us.

Though the university is geared for the privileged few, the students, like all North Koreans, are tightly controlled. The young men were closely monitored by female guards, they were not allowed off campus except for group outings, they were discouraged from asking about the wider world.

On the day before Kim left the country in December 2011, North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-Il died, sending the nation into mourning.

The next morning, the students “looked as though they’d been crying all night, as though their souls had been sucked out of them, as though they’d just lost a parent,” said Kim.

She spoke with Morning Edition’s Steve Inskeep about her rare insider’s glimpse of the reclusive country.

Interview Highlights

On speaking about the country’s leader

You don’t talk about Great Leader [Kim Il-Sung, the country's founder] by name. You certainly never, ever bring up anything about the outside world. The fact that I travel outside, really, is not something that I was supposed to talk about. But then, you live together for months and months and share three meals a day together. Then, suddenly, things start happening where you ask things.

On what the students asked

One time, a student did ask me about a national assembly. I think it was a word he picked up somewhere.

There was no way you could discuss that without bringing democracy into a conversation. And once I began talking about it, I got very nervous because the students were all watching each other and reporting on each other. After we discussed democracy at the table, later, another student, who’s a roommate of that student, told me that he’s with me. Meaning, he thinks like me. And that really scared me, because I thought, then, some of them are questioning the system.

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Suki Kim is also the author of The Interpreter, a novel.

Ed Kashi/Courtesy of Crown


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Ed Kashi/Courtesy of Crown

Suki Kim is also the author of The Interpreter, a novel.

Suki Kim is also the author of The Interpreter, a novel.

Ed Kashi/Courtesy of Crown

On how cut-off the students were from the wider world

Some were more sheltered than others. Whatever the reason was, on [the] surface, because it is a system so based — built on fear, they’re not supposed to admit it, even if they knew. They were never supposed to admit to knowing what’s going on outside. So for example, we talked about the way they celebrate birthdays.

Usually, they go back to their dormitory after dinner and they start singing songs, one by one. And they all always claimed, the Great Leader’s songs, or songs about friendship. One time, one student said, “Rock ‘n’ roll.” The minute he said that, the whole table went quiet. The student just looked out instantly, as if some horrible thing was just admitted. And then someone changed the topic and I realized, this is the fear. It was a kind of reality that is so impossible to imagine for us Americans, and I thought it was important to humanize North Koreans.

On how the elite fear they could be purged

I’ve covered North Korea for over a decade, interviewed so many defectors, and this was the other extreme of the society, and they had no freedom.

I don’t know how they absolutely keep that control. But we just saw, you know, [current leader] Kim Jung-Un getting his uncle executed, Jang Song Thaek, at the end of 2013. And that is [the] No. 2 man in North Korea for decades, who is a relative of the Great Leader.

I think it’s just a different system. I had assumed, also, that maybe the elite — you know, maybe the images that those people control – that they have so much freedom, but that just simply was not true.

On the ubiquitous female guards at the university

It is so controlled. The guards were only women — young women in their early 20s — and they never mixed words with the staff. I tried, but they wouldn’t talk back to me. And they were minders, minders living in the faculty dormitory on the ground floor, and all they ever did was just guard us. It was very, very systematically controlled. …

I did ask about that several times to the foreign teachers, “Why is this the case?” The answer that I got was that in the beginning of the school, they had put men there — soldiers — but they realized that maybe it just looks too threatening, so they changed the soldiers to women soldiers.

On whether the students and the guards ever fell in love

That would make a really good Hollywood movie. And I did imagine that because these were just, you know, 19-, 20-year-old beautiful boys. But then, I realized also, at some point, I learned that they come from a completely different social strata that it just wasn’t possible, supposedly.

On what she took away from her six months at the university

This was my fifth visit in North Korea and I felt the incredible sorrow in my last time more so than ever because I spent so much time, and I got to observe so many things first hand at the school. And because they were so young – 19 and 20 – and I think from that, really loving them, to a degree, and understanding their world, it made me really think what a claustrophobic and inhuman place North Korea is.

You know, it’s kind of like thinking my kids are trapped there. It was heartbreaking on a daily basis. And also to leave, and also knowing that’s the world that they will possibly be the leaders — they’re the future leaders of North Korea.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/22/357632699/among-the-young-and-privileged-in-north-korea?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

3 American Teens Reportedly Suspected Of Trying To Join ISIS

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 22 2014
Updated at 4:45 a.m. ET.

Three teenage girls from the Denver suburbs were taken into custody by German authorities over the weekend at Frankfurt airport while trying to travel to Turkey, U.S. officials reported on Tuesday, according to The Associated Press.

Citing unnamed officials, the AP and CNN report that investigators in the case believe the girls may have been trying to join a wave of foreigners from dozens of nations who have used Turkey as a route into Syria to fight with the Islamic State, also known as ISIS.

Police in Arapahoe County had originally treated the girls’ disappearance as a standard runaway case, Colorado Public Radio’s Megan Verlee tells our Newscast Desk. Two of the girls, age 15 and 17, are sisters. Their father had reported his daughters missing, along with their passports and $2,000. The third girl, age 16, is an acquaintance of the sisters. Her father reported her missing when the school called to say she had not been in class that day.

The three girls are now home with their families in Aurora, Colo. It is not yet clear whether they will face any charges.

The 16-year-old’s family is from Sudan and the sisters are of ethnic Somali origin, according to The Denver Post. Reuters reported that Colorado has a large population of refugees from Somalia who work in meatpacking plants.

The girls are not the first young women from Colorado this year to be stopped while attempting to travel overseas to join the Islamic State. A 19-year-old from Arvada, Colo., pleaded guilty last month to conspiracy charges after trying to travel to Syria in April. She planned to meet and marry a Tunisian man there who claimed to be fighting with the Islamic State. The two had met online.

FBI Director James Comey said in an interview on the CBS News broadcast 60 Minutes that the American government knows of about a dozen U.S. citizens fighting alongside militants in Syria. Comey said a big concern with these citizens is what they plan to do once they return home.

“Ultimately, an American citizen, unless their passport’s revoked, is entitled to come back,” says Comey. “So someone who’s fought with ISIL, with an American passport wants to come back, we will track them very carefully.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/10/22/357958538/3-american-teens-suspected-of-trying-to-join-the-islamic-state?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

How To Pick An English Name (Tip: Stay Away From Food)

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 21 2014

China Central Television has a guide for helping people pick alternative English names for those studying the language or working for international firms. Among its warnings: “Many Chinese like to pick names that are in fact, not names.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/21/357737203/how-to-pick-an-english-name-tip-stay-away-from-food?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Oscar Pistorius Gets 5 Years In Prison For Killing Girlfriend

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 21 2014

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Tuesday in Pretoria, South Africa, Oscar Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend.

Herman Verwey/AP


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Herman Verwey/AP

Tuesday in Pretoria, South Africa, Oscar Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend.

Tuesday in Pretoria, South Africa, Oscar Pistorius was sentenced to five years in prison for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend.

Herman Verwey/AP

Track star Oscar Pistorius has been sentenced to five years in prison for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.

Pistorius, an Olympic and Paralympic athlete, was given a verdict of culpable homicide by a judge in South Africa in September — a conviction that could have put him in prison for 15 years. As we reported at the time, Pistorius was found not guilty of the more serious charge of premeditated murder.

The Two-Way reported:

“[Judge Thokozile Masipa] said there wasn’t sufficient evidence to support the notion that Pistorius, 27, knew that Reeva Steenkamp was behind a locked toilet door in his home when he fired several shots on the morning of Valentine’s Day 2013.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/10/21/357738319/oscar-pistorius-gets-5-years-in-prison-for-killing-girlfriend?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Chinese Telecom Company Offers To Make Pockets iPhone-Sized

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 21 2014

China Unicom’s tailor has set up a sewing machine, ready to alter concerned customers’ pants so that the larger version of the phone will fit in their pockets.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/21/357737277/chinese-telecom-company-offers-to-make-pockets-iphone-sized?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Nigeria Joins Senegal In Gaining ‘Ebola-Free’ Status

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Oct 20 2014

Steve Inskeep talks to NPR’s Ofeibea Quist-Arcton about how Nigeria and Senegal were able to rid their countries of Ebola, despite the ongoing outbreak in West Africa.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/10/20/357508947/nigeria-joins-senegal-in-gaining-ebola-free-status?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world