Posts Tagged ‘Israel grossman’

Mexico’s Soccer Coach Fired After Punching TV Reporter

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 30 2015



MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

He’s been a hilarious one-man spectacle on the soccer sidelines, leaping around, gesturing wildly with goofy facial expressions. I’m talking about Miguel Herrera, the coach of Mexico’s national team – make that former coach. He’s been fired after he allegedly punched a Mexican journalist in the neck, a TV commentator who’s been highly critical of the coach and the team’s performance. The encounter happened at the Philadelphia International Airport. And Herrera’s firing comes just two days after the Mexican national team won the Gold Cup in Philly. ESPN soccer commentator Fernando Palomo says exactly what went down at the airport is sketchy, but something did happen.

FERNANDO PALOMO: It’s clear from the versions provided by both parties that there was an altercation, and it turned physical at some point. But it wouldn’t take physical violence for me to disapprove of the actions.

BLOCK: Well, help us understand what’s been going on with the Mexican national team. Ten head coaches in nine years – now it’s going to need another one.

PALOMO: Well, it’s this reflection of a cultural habit – very impatient soccer culture that wants things to happen immediately and won’t take failure as an option. And this is, again – it’s a deeper discussion, I believe, but one that I’m extremely fascinated by – how our cultures tend to think that we have to provide – have our answers provided by one single individual. And when the answers are not provided, the person is to blame. And that person is the head coach of the national team. In Germany, throughout the history of their national team, they’ve had 10 coaches.

BLOCK: How is the news of Miguel Herrera’s firing being received by fans in Mexico?

PALOMO: The fan base is split on the decision. Some disapprove of the firing, and I guess most of those that disapproved actually would have liked to do the same thing that Miguel Herrera did to that journalist. And the other half is just tired of the fact that the coach – the head coach – takes so much of the light upon himself. He was accepted to begin with because of his exuberant personality, and now his exuberant personality makes him a victim of the role he took.

BLOCK: Well, he has been hugely entertaining to watch on the sidelines – I mean, his gestures, his crazy faces, that hair, that mop of hair that seems to have a life of its own. Do you expect that the next Mexican national coach will be as dramatic, flamboyant, exuberant as Miguel Herrera has been?

PALOMO: I think they will tend to go to a more subdued person, and I think that the more they decide to go on that direction, the more they’ll miss Bill Herrera because the discussion relied too much on the coach and very little on the soccer. And it saved Mexico from having a soccer discussion they should’ve had before because the team wasn’t performing.

BLOCK: Oh, so it was a distraction.

PALOMO: He was a distraction, yes. And the team wasn’t – and he took a lot of the load away from the players, and the players like that. When players don’t get the type of criticism that the coaches get, well, the players are better off. But now the discussion is to turn on the soccer.

BLOCK: Well, Mr. Palomo, thanks so much for talking with us today.

PALOMO: Thank you. Thank you for having me.

BLOCK: Fernando Palomo is a soccer commentator for ESPN. We were talking about the firing of the head coach of Mexico’s national soccer team two days after they won the Gold Cup in Philadelphia.

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Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427464702/mexicos-soccer-coach-fired-after-punching-tv-reporter?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Debris In The Indian Ocean May Have Come From Vanished Airliner

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 30 2015

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A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island the Indian Ocean. It’s not clear yet whether the debris from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year.

YANNICK PITOU/AFP/Getty Images


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A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island the Indian Ocean. It's not clear yet whether the debris from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year.

A piece of a wing, apparently from a Boeing 777, has been found on Reunion, an island the Indian Ocean. It’s not clear yet whether the debris from the Malaysia Airlines jet that disappeared from radar during a flight last year.

YANNICK PITOU/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities on the French island of Réunion in the Indian Ocean have found debris that may be from a missing Malaysia Airlines jet.

A source familiar with the investigation tells NPR’s Geoff Brumfiel that the debris appears to have come from a large passenger aircraft, but it remains unclear whether it’s from Malaysia Airlines flight 370, which vanished from radar on March 8, 2014.

The Boeing 777 took off from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and was flying to Beijing, China, with 239 people on board. About an hour after departure, the flight crew made a final radio transmission and was never heard from again.

As Geoff reported for our Newscast unit:

“Up until now, the only lead in the search for the plane were brief transmissions it sent to an orbiting satellite in the hours after it disappeared. Based on that signal, investigators believed the aircraft flew to the Southern Indian Ocean near Australia, before it ran out of fuel and crashed.”

Investigators have found a 9-foot by 3-foot section of a white wing. It appears to be a part called a “flaperon” which combines flaps (the trailing edge of the wing that help planes during takeoff and landings) and ailerons (which turn the aircraft). Several media outlets are quoting senior Boeing officials who say the debris is consistent with a 777.

Pictures show the wing part has likely been in the water for a while. There will be serial numbers on the flaperon that investigators will use to definitively say whether this debris came from the missing plane.

Models by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau suggest the debris could have reached Réunion within this timeframe, and that is “consistent with the drift modeling.” In addition to the French investigators, officials from Malaysia are also heading to the island.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/07/29/427576392/debris-in-the-indian-ocean-may-have-come-from-vanished-airliner?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

In The West Bank, A Rough Start Doesn’t Deter New Arab TV Channel

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 30 2015

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Afaf Shini, a host on the Palestine 48 TV channel, holds a reading card with the satellite channel’s logo during a morning broadcast in Ramallah in July. Israel shut down operations just days after the launch.

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Afaf Shini, a host on the Palestine 48 TV channel, holds a reading card with the satellite channel's logo during a morning broadcast in Ramallah in July. Israel shut down operations just days after the launch.

Afaf Shini, a host on the Palestine 48 TV channel, holds a reading card with the satellite channel’s logo during a morning broadcast in Ramallah in July. Israel shut down operations just days after the launch.

Nasser Nasser/AP

One out of every five people in Israel is Arab. But Israeli TV only sets aside a few hours a week for Arabic-language programming. And Arabs in Israel don’t have many opportunities to see their own cities and lives reflected on the screen. That’s the idea behind a new TV channel. It’s called Palestine 48, a reference to the year Israel was founded.

The channel’s new morning show is called Our Morning Is Different. It’s like an Arabic version of the Today show, with a breezy opening jingle and stock footage of sunlight peeking through a field.

Two hosts sit on a curved, red couch. Afaf Shini is wearing a hot-pink sleeveless shirt. Her co-host, Doraid Liddawi, is wearing a buttoned diamond-checkered shirt. They’re both from predominantly Arab cities in Israel.

They start with a weather report: Nazareth, 30 degrees Celsius. Haifa, 29.

The temperatures are all pretty much the same. But this is actually one of the most satisfying parts of the show for co-host Liddawi, because he’s talking about Israeli cities with significant Arab populations.

“I’m not a weather reporter,” Liddawi says. “But it’s nice to say the name of the city: Tarshiha. Nasara. Haifa. That’s Tarshiha, Nazareth and Haifa. Just to mention these words, it’s something for us. For me.”

When Israel was founded, many Palestinians fled or were forced out. The Arabs of Israel are the ones who stayed put. Some Jewish Israelis suspect them of being a fifth column. Some Arabs see them as sellouts for taking Israeli citizenship. No one sees them much on TV.

But, says Liddawi, “We are here, we want to be on the map, we are on the map. And this is the good platform.”

The head of the channel, Firas Abdulrahman, says it was the brainchild of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. It’s funded by Abbas’ government in the West Bank.

It started broadcasting last month from Nazareth, the largest Arab city in Israel. There was a cooking segment and field reports on historical and religious sites.

But just days after Palestine 48 went on the air, Israel ordered the studio closed. It had no Israeli operating permit. And the backing from Abbas violates Israel’s ban on the Palestinian Authority establishing organizations in Israel.

Israel’s public security minister said he wouldn’t let the Palestinian government gain a “foothold” in Israel.

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Doraid Liddawi and his co-host Afaf Sheni interview Palestinian Arab rappers and citizens of Israel on the makeshift Ramallah set of Palestine 48′s morning show.

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Daniel Estrin for NPR

Doraid Liddawi and his co-host Afaf Sheni interview Palestinian Arab rappers and citizens of Israel on the makeshift Ramallah set of Palestine 48's morning show.

Doraid Liddawi and his co-host Afaf Sheni interview Palestinian Arab rappers and citizens of Israel on the makeshift Ramallah set of Palestine 48′s morning show.

Daniel Estrin for NPR

So now Palestine 48 broadcasts from the roof of a hotel in the West Bank city of Ramallah. The hosts are their same bubbly selves — but without the field reports from Israel, they’re struggling to fill airtime.

Abdulrahman says its lawyers are fighting to get the Israeli studio back open. He thinks his channel reflects a bigger reality about his home.

“Jews, Muslims and Christians have lived for many years inseparably in their natural environment,” he says. “How can you now separate this? I think our future is to live together under whichever name you choose.”

Co-host Liddawi says he and the channel can offer a lot to satellite TV viewers throughout the Middle East. As an Arab who lives among Jews in Israel, he says he can dispel stereotypes about Judaism. And he wants to show Palestinian refugees throughout the world the sights of their homeland.

“It’s a satellite, man,” he says, laughing. “There’s really no borders. A lot of Palestinians, they are abroad and they can’t come back here or come here. And we are giving them this opportunity to see, to feel, to smell, to look. And I think it is an important thing what we are doing in this channel.”

He’s hoping the channel will be able to reopen a studio in Israel so they can film there again. Because, he says, right now the show is a little dull.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/07/30/427457054/in-the-west-bank-a-rough-start-doesnt-deter-new-arab-tv-channel?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Action On Guantanamo Will Likely Wait Until After Congresss’ Summer Recess

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 29 2015

Congressional Republicans have demanded the White House send them a plan for closing the lockup at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. President Obama’s top counterterrorism adviser recently outlined such a plan.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427318480/action-on-guantanamo-will-likely-wait-until-after-congresss-summer-recess?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Imprisoned Israeli Spy Jonathan Pollard To Be Paroled In November

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 29 2015

Israelis support the release of convicted spy Jonathan Pollard from a U.S. jail. He was arrested in 1985 and charged with passing secrets to Israel. Steve Inskeep talks to reporter Daniel Estrin.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427318508/imprisoned-israeli-spy-jonathan-pollard-to-be-paroled-in-november?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

South Koreans Bristle At Growing Dominance Of Family-Run Conglomerates

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 29 2015

A small number of family-run conglomerates dominate South Korea’s economy. The biggest started as a village store in 1938. It’s controlled by the same family, and is now a household name: Samsung.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/29/427318529/south-koreans-bristle-at-growing-dominance-of-family-run-conglomerates?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

How Finns Make Sports Part Of Everyday Life

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 28 2015

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The sporting options in Finland are everywhere. Here, two people take advantage of the ice on Lake Hiidenvesi to get some exercise.

The sporting options in Finland are everywhere. Here, two people take advantage of the ice on Lake Hiidenvesi to get some exercise.



Sami Uskela/Flickr

In Helsinki, sports facilities pop up all over the place, sometimes in some pretty odd nooks and crannies. One bomb shelter hosts an archery club, another an underground swimming pool and an ice hockey rink.

Though they hardly need it, there’s a national plan in Finland to get people to sit less. It reminds them, in fact, that “Under the Constitution … physical activity is a basic cultural right.”

“It’s been kind of a social right to provide citizens with sporting possibilities,” says Hanna Vehmas, a sports scientist at the University of Jyväskylä. She says it’s a Nordic thing to consider sports a social right. That thinking started in the 1970s, when governments started subsidizing sports gyms in even the smallest towns.

Now, she says, “there’s an estimate of some close to 30,000 sports facilities in this country, which is said to be more per capita than in any other country in the world.”

Those facilities are one reason why Finland and its Nordic neighbors always make the top five list of most physically active European countries, according to surveys by the European Commission. These days, municipalities spend about $700 million a year subsidizing sports facilities and clubs. A portion of lottery funds also goes toward funding sports facilities and research.

Walkways and bike paths snake through the cities. Public swimming pools are busy year round, even above the Arctic Circle. And during the cold, dark winters, cross-country skiers cut tracks in the snow through parks, across the solid lakes, even on the frozen Baltic Sea.

“Here you can more or less just step out of your door and go,” Vehmas says.

Finns do just that. Half of women, and a third of men, say they bike to work. About a fifth of the country belong to sports clubs or federations. Some of them even play sports at work.

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A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.

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A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.

A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.

Rae Ellen Bichell for NPR

A poll by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found there’s a gender gap when it comes to sports in adulthood in the U.S. Men are more than twice as likely as women (35 percent to 16 percent) to say they play sports.

Every Wednesday morning, a group of scientists at the Finnish Meteorological Institute and the University of Helsinki ditch their desks to play “futsal,” an indoor form of soccer, in a gym across the street. It’s one of the most popular team sports in the country, along with floor hockey and Finnish baseball.

The bosses of these meteorologists and computer scientists encourage them to play sports on the clock for an hour a week.

“My own boss plays badminton, floorball, and futsal. And his boss also plays futsal,” says Mika Heiskanen of the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

When it comes to employee fitness, these employers are hardly exceptional in Finland. The postal service has orienteering and riflery teams. A nearby chocolate factory has a gym and offers aerobics classes. And, Heiskanen says, he and his teammates regularly take on other government agencies, like customs officials and police units.

Ossi Aura, who specializes in occupational health care at the health care company Terveystalo, says the trend of employers encouraging sports participation started about a century ago with the forestry industry.

“Nowadays, 90 percent of employers support their employees’ physical activity in some way,” he explains.

Each year, Finnish employers spend an average of about 200 euros per employee for physical activity, or about $220. The money goes to anything from gym vouchers, to providing workout facilities and saunas. Even factories offer such services.

Yes, in fact they have their locker rooms, they have their showers, they have their saunas, based on the ancient agreements between workers’ unions,” says Aura.

Today, one reason employers tend to support their employees’ physical activity is because of a tax break. Businesses can deduct money spent on employees’ physical wellbeing, which includes promoting sports and exercise.

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A man bikes past the Central Station in downtown Helsinki.

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A man bikes past the Central Station in downtown Helsinki.

A man bikes past the Central Station in downtown Helsinki.

Franck Guiziou/Hemis/Corbis

But there’s something else. “We have a lot of research showing that investing in work well-being will bring back as much as six times” the money invested, says Matleena Livson of the Finnish Sports Confederation. “Because you reduce sick leaves, you improve the cohesiveness and good spirit, and you improve employer image at the workplace.”

Livson and Aura say it’s understood in Finland and other Nordic countries that healthy employees do better work. They also don’t have as many sick days. And staying fit, especially by playing sports together, could help build company cohesion and loyalty. “And that’s actually even more important than the health side,” says Aura.

Physically active people also save the healthcare system a lot of money. According to a calculator devised by the World Health Organization, the Finnish Ministry of Social Affairs Health estimates that people who bike and walk save the health care system as much as 5 billion euros, or about $5.5 billion, each year.

But state subsidies are now being cut in Finland. Hanna Vehmas says sports funding is taking a hit. “The private sector has become more responsible for providing sports supply,” says the University of Jyväskylä’s Vehmas. “Sports participation is more than before becoming a commodity, something that you need to buy. And then people can afford it or they cannot afford it.”

Our Sports and Health series continues over the summer, based on the results of our poll with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/07/28/426748088/how-finns-make-sports-part-of-everyday-life?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Same-Sex Couples Strive For Marriage Rights In Every EU Country

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 28 2015

The European Union has standards for labor, trade and sanitation, but same-sex marriage is left to member states. Only about a dozen EU countries recognize such unions.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/28/427018666/same-sex-couples-strive-for-marriage-rights-in-every-eu-country?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Immigration Changes Create Refugee Crisis Along Dominican Republic-Haiti Border

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 28 2015

Refugee camps are appearing along Haiti’s border with the Dominican Republic as people flee the DR to comply with new immigration laws. It’s unclear how the Haitian government will manage the crisis.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/28/427019702/immigration-changes-create-refugee-crisis-along-dominican-republic-haiti-border?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Moderate Muslims Counter Islamic State Propaganda With Own Media Strategy

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jul 27 2015

Imam Omar Atia (left) and Zac Parsons discuss Islam’s teachings in effort to combat what they see as misinformation being spread about the religion.

U.S. officials are concerned about the recruiting efforts of the self-proclaimed Islamic State, also known as ISIS, as the group has stepped up its online outreach.

One team in Southwestern Indiana who opposes the radical Islamist group is taking to the web to reclaim the message of Islam.

Dozens of four-minute web episodes, targeting young people with questions about Islam and its relationship to violence, are being released by Reclamation Studios.

In one episode, Zac Parsons is walking side-by-side with Imam Omar Atia, on a sunny day in Evansville, Ind., asking him a question about Islam:

“You’re a Muslim guy, a peaceful guy and yet, you know, we see all this stuff in the news all the time about, you know, terrorism and violence and killing, you know, in the name of Islam — which is supposed to be a religion of peace. How is it that for them it’s not peaceful, but for you it is?”

“It’s not even left for question,” Atia says. “Unjust killing is completely forbidden.”

The video, “Does Islam Encourage Violence?” is simply an interaction between Parsons and Atia, the leader of the Islamic Society of Evansville.

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Atia, co-founder of Reclamation Studios’ initiative, wants to try to dispel the image here that Islam is a foreign religion that forces believers to choose between nation and faith.

“There’s still this identity crisis that a lot of Muslim-Americans live, unfortunately,” Atia says, “because right now, still, the concept that Islam is a foreign faith to America.”

Parsons, a digital marketer, says these videos try to be engaging enough to reach younger viewers.

“Unfortunately, ISIS is doing a great job of creating that really compelling ‘this is something you can do to change the world,’ ” he says, “And we hope that we’re able to use some of those same ideas and technology to say ‘no, this is actually what the religion of Islam teaches.’ “

Nour Shams, who works on Reclamation Studios’ website from Egypt, says it’s important to get this information across as directly as possible.

“They can ask us questions, we can do consultations, we can give them further answers for any questions that they have,” she says. “We can even host people and just have everything transparent in front of the camera, and listen to people and answer their questions.”

Richard Maass, who researches international security at the University of Evansville, says the Islamic State has been successful at targeting isolated people who have little or no knowledge of Islam.

“So the more initiatives like this one that openly refute ISIS ideology, especially online — and especially through live communications with people online — the more difficult it will be for ISIS to monopolize the perceptions of those vulnerable individuals,” he says.

There are now more than a dozen people working on this project; the goal is to produce 70 web episodes, all in an effort to help counter what they see as misinformation about Islam.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/07/27/424961326/moderate-muslims-counter-islamic-state-propaganda-with-own-media-strategy?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world