Like Greece, Cash-Strapped Puerto Rico Needs A Fiscal Lifeline

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 30 2015



ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Over the weekend, two dramas played out simultaneously in the world’s financial markets. In Greece, the government announced it would shut down the country’s banks after efforts to reach agreement with its European creditors ran aground. And in Puerto Rico, the governor of the U.S. territory announced that it could no longer pay its debts and would seek concessions from its creditors. As NPR’s Jim Zarroli reports, Puerto Rico’s debt troubles have a lot in common with those of Greece and there are also important differences.

JIM ZARROLI, BYLINE: Like Greece, Puerto Rico saw its economy weaken substantially during the past decade. Its unemployment rate soared. For a while, Puerto Rico borrowed heavily to keep up government spending, but over time, it couldn’t get out of the fiscal hole it had dug. David Tawil is president of Maglan Capital, which purchases distressed government debt.

DAVID TAWIL: Greece seems to have some pretty fundamental headwinds that it faces, you know, in terms of its economy, in terms of its tax collection, in terms of its pension burden. Puerto Rico has a lot of those same types of issues.

ZARROLI: Today, Puerto Rico was unable to pay its debts and its governor says he will ask its creditors for more time. While the Treasury Department isn’t commenting on Puerto Rico’s problems, there have been published reports that the island is seeking a loan from the federal government. With the bond markets all but closed to the commonwealth, any solution to Puerto Rico’s troubles is likely to involve some type of federal help. Economist Arturo Porzecanski teaches at American University.

ARTURO PORZECANSKI: What Greece is for the eurozone, that’s what Puerto Rico’s going to become for us. It is going to become a territory which we’re going to have to subsidize even more than before, give more tax breaks; eventually give federal aid.

ZARROLI: But there are important differences that mitigate Puerto Rico’s risk to the financial system. Puerto Rico is a tiny part of the U.S. economy, even smaller than Greece is to the eurozone. And because the island a U.S. territory, its banks are already guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. That prevents the kind of bank runs now plaguing Greece. David Tawil says the mutual funds and banks that invested in Puerto Rican bonds have had ample warning about the island’s troubles and many sold off their holdings at a loss long ago.

TAWIL: The fact that we – the market has had such a heads up for so long has allowed anyone who’s wanted to bail on the sinking ship, so to say, to get out. And those folks that see opportunity, you know, went in with eyes wide open.

ZARROLI: Many of those who still hold Puerto Rican bonds are distressed debt investors who bought them cheap and are hanging on in hopes of making a killing. If Puerto Rico isn’t the kind of systemic problem that Greece has been, it does present policy challenges to the federal government. Former IMF economist Andrew Wolfe is one of the authors of a report on Puerto Rico that was released today.

ANDREW WOLFE: The interesting dilemma I think for the U.S. Treasury is, you know, what type of assistance can they give and what precedent does it send to other distressed states, let’s say, that may come down the pipe.

ZARROLI: Wolfe says there are a lot of cities and states in fiscal trouble right now. As conditions on Puerto Rico deteriorate, they’ll be watching to see what kind of help Washington prides. And Washington will want to avoid sending signals that it’s ready to provide bailouts to all who find themselves in trouble. Jim Zarroli, NPR News, New York.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/06/29/418641161/like-greece-to-europe-puerto-rico-is-americas-sinking-ship?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

U.N. Holds Climate Talks In New York Ahead Of Paris Meeting

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 30 2015



ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Diplomacy comes in many forms, from secret backroom discussions to grand public speeches, and today, it has been more the latter at the United Nations in New York City. Diplomats from all over the world are there to talk about climate change. And NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce is listening, and she joins us from U.N. headquarters. Nell, set the scene for us. What’s been going on there today?

NELL GREENFIELDBOYCE, BYLINE: Well, there’s been a lot of talk, as you can imagine. I’m standing in a booth overlooking the meeting hall, which has got all these tables arranged in a horseshoe around a big screen. And basically, country after country has been having representatives talk. Just looking around the room – I’m looking at labels on the chairs – we’ve got Italy, we’ve got Indonesia, we’ve got India. People have spoken from China, France, Brazil, so a lot of countries here are making their views heard.

SIEGEL: And what’s the purpose of this meeting?

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Well, the main purpose is to keep attention focused on the effort to get a serious global warming agreement – basically, an agreement to rein in the emissions of greenhouse gases that are warming the planet. And this is going to be the final agreement negotiated later this year in Paris. And it would be the first time that both developing and developed countries make commitments to try to contain their greenhouse gas emissions that’s supposed to take effect in 2020. And what’s happening now is not really negotiations, but just sort of trying to keep momentum going towards that goal.

SIEGEL: But there have been negotiating sessions before this. Are the countries anywhere close to a deal?

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Well, there’s a lot of key issues unresolved. The last negotiation session was earlier this month and there’s a lot of key issues that are unresolved. At that session, they had this 90-page draft agreement that they were trying to sort of streamline and cut down into something more manageable. And at the end of about 11 days, they had cut it down to 85 pages instead of 90 pages, so there’s a lot left to do. And they’ve said here today that they hope to have another draft agreement presented to the group at the end of July, so a lot of people are worried that the pace is rather slow.

SIEGEL: Well, what are the major issues that the countries disagree on?

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Well, there’s some really big issues, like how will countries be held accountable for the promises they make about what they’re going to do to try to control climate change and how will those promises be reviewed and sort of, you know, make sure people actually do what they say they’re going to? Another issue is finance. There have been pledges of, you know, a goal of $100 billion a year by 2020 that would help developing countries both adapt to climate change and sort of shift to strategies that would mitigate emissions. So where’s that money going to come from? Is it going to be public? Is it going to be public-private partnership? Other issues are what are the long-term goals? I mean, years ago, there was a goal set that they were going to try to limit warming to 2 degrees Celsius. But so far, people have been looking at the promises that countries have put forward as part of this negotiation, and they’ve said, you know, what we see so far is not going to get us to that goal. So what should the long-term goals be?

SIEGEL: As part of this process, countries have to come up with their own plans for what they’re willing to do to fight climate change. How many countries have actually submitted plans to the U.N. by now?

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Well, there’s about 11 countries, plus the European Union, and so places like the United States, Russia and Canada have submitted their plans. They’re still waiting for plans from big players like Brazil and China. And here today, both of those countries said that they were working on their plans and hope to submit them soon.

SIEGEL: That’s NPR’s Nell Greenfieldboyce at the U.N. Nell, thanks.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Thank you.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/06/29/418641168/u-n-holds-climate-talks-in-new-york-ahead-of-paris-meeting?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Greeks Brace For The Fallout As Deadline Looms

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 30 2015

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A Greek demonstrator urges a “no” vote in Sunday’s referendum on whether Greece should accept international demands for additional financial austerity. He is holding an old 1,000 Greek drachma bank note during a rally in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki on Monday. Some Greeks say the country should leave the eurozone and go back to the drachma.

Giannis Papanikos/AP


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Giannis Papanikos/AP

A Greek demonstrator urges a no vote in Sunday's referendum on whether Greece should accept international demands for additional financial austerity. He is holding an old 1,000 Greek drachma bank note during a rally in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki on Monday. Some Greeks say the country should leave the eurozone and go back to the drachma.

A Greek demonstrator urges a “no” vote in Sunday’s referendum on whether Greece should accept international demands for additional financial austerity. He is holding an old 1,000 Greek drachma bank note during a rally in the northern Greek port city of Thessaloniki on Monday. Some Greeks say the country should leave the eurozone and go back to the drachma.

Giannis Papanikos/AP

Giorgos Koronis is welcoming tourists from the U.S. and England at the old Olympic Stadium in Athens, where the first modern Olympics were held in 1896.

Koronis, 50, has worked for the state for 25 years, mainly at ticket counters at various tourist sites around the Greek capital. But today he’s struggling to smile.

He spent Monday morning at the ATM in line with a few retirees from his neighborhood, including his mother.

“Sixty euros — that’s how much I pulled out,” he says. That’s just under $70 and it’s the limit for Greek bank depositors amid the current crisis.

“Maybe tomorrow, though, I will only be able to pull out half of that,” he adds.

The international bailout program that has been keeping the Greek economy on life support ends Tuesday. An important payment of 1.6 billion euros, or $1.73 billion is due to the International Monetary Fund and Greece will miss it. Banks are closed and will remain shut until at least next week.

Greece’s anti-austerity government has asked Greeks to vote this Sunday on a new, though unfinished, bailout deal. The ATM withdrawals are limited so Greek banks — which are very low on capital — can stay solvent. Yet many ATMs are running out of cash, and all this is happening at the height of tourism season.

Greeks have been dealing with these crises for several years and have learned to cope with financial uncertainty. Still, Koronis and many other Greeks are worried this time. He’s a little angry at the government for asking him to vote in Sunday’s referendum on a bailout deal he says he doesn’t understand.

“I really hope it doesn’t lead to us getting out of the euro,” he says. “I’m afraid we are all going to go hungry if that happens. But even now, with the euro, all these cuts, I keep worrying my salary will be cut even more.”

Related Stories

The Impact On Tourists

A group of American high school students from Saline, Mich., and their chaperones are at the stadium.

They arrived in Greece over the weekend. They can theoretically withdraw all the cash they want since their bank is not in Greece. But many ATMs are empty.

Dane Hoffman, 17, says the group spent the weekend in the ancient city of Olympia, where the Olympics were born. One ATM had a line filled with worried Greeks, he says.

“In Olympia, in that long line of people, some of the people in front of us were withdrawing all of the cash they could out of the ATMs,” he says. They were able to withdraw as much as they wanted before the restrictions went into effect Monday.

One of the chaperones, Kurt Trainor, 46, says shop owners in Olympia asked the Americans to pay in euros.

“They’re asking you not to use your credit card, just because they don’t know what’s going to happen, so they would rather have you use euros,” he says.

Bigger Problems Loom

Greek economist Platon Tinios says the problems will just get bigger as the week goes on. Tuesday is an important marker because of the debt repayment that Greece won’t be able to make to the IMF.

“It’s like an ice cube compared to the iceberg, which is catching up to us … which is the overall default,” says Tinios. “It’s an important milestone, not paying the IMF could place Greece in the company of pariah nations such as Somalia, Sudan and so on, but we probably won’t get there straight away.”

Manolis Spathis, a 29-year-old unemployed economist, says that even if Greece were to get an additional bailout offer, it should reject it. He was one of thousands outside Parliament on Monday evening urging Greeks to vote “no” in Sunday’s referendum.

He says the way out of the economic mess is clear.

“The only way is to get out of the euro,” he says. “I’m unemployed. And I don’t own my house. I have to pay rent. So in six months from now, if the situation doesn’t improve, I will be homeless.”

He’s not alone. Many Greeks are frustrated with the damage that imposed austerity has wrought on the country.

But public opinion polls show that most Greeks still want to keep the euro as their currency.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/06/29/417415623/greeks-brace-for-the-fallout-as-deadline-looms?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Greece To Close Banks, Impose Capital Controls Amid Looming Default

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 29 2015

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A security worker brings money to a National Bank branch in Athens on Sunday. Greeks have been withdrawing euros in anticipation of a possible default on the country’s debt payments early next week.

Marko Djurica/Reuters/Landov


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A security worker brings money to a National Bank branch in Athens on Sunday. Greeks have been withdrawing euros in anticipation of a possible default on the country's debt payments early next week.

A security worker brings money to a National Bank branch in Athens on Sunday. Greeks have been withdrawing euros in anticipation of a possible default on the country’s debt payments early next week.

Marko Djurica/Reuters/Landov

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET

Greece’s Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras announced Sunday that banks will be closed and capital controls imposed in order to stave off a run on the euro after negotiations with the country’s international lenders broke down.

He said the Athens stock market would also be closed.

However, Tsipras blamed the European Central Bank for the latest crisis after it decided not to increase the amount of emergency liquidity amid a run on the banks that saw people lined up at ATMs, many of which ran dry amid the onslaught.

“It is now more than clear that this decision has no other aim than to blackmail the will of the Greek people and prevent the smooth democratic process of the referendum,” Tsipras said in a televised address to the Greek people, according to The Associated Press.

“[Rejection] of the Greek government’s request for a short extension of the program was an unprecedented act by European standards, questioning the right of a sovereign people to decide,” he said.

“This decision led the ECB today to limit the liquidity available to Greek banks and forced the Greek central bank to suggest a bank holiday and restrictions on bank withdrawals,” Tsipras said, without elaborating on how long the bank holiday would continue.

On Saturday, Tsipras called for a national referendum on July 5 to decide the fate of a bailout package hammered out in negotiations led by Germany, the home of the ECB and the grouping’s strongest economy. Finance ministers with the European Union have rejected the surprise vote.

The premier’s remarks also come as the country’s opposition leader, Antonis Samaras, called for Tsipras to scrap the referendum and form a government of national unity.

A default on a 1.6 billion euro ($1.9 billion) debt due the International Monetary Fund on Tuesday could presage an exit from the eurozone and a return to a heavily devalued version of Greece’s former currency, the drachma.

As Joanna Kakissis reports from Athens for NPR: “Some European leaders say the Greek government closed the door on negotiations by calling a referendum. Others are pushing for a compromise to preserve the euro.”

As The New York Times reports:

“The central bank’s 25-member governing council, convened by conference call, was discussing how and whether to extend an emergency line of credit — currently worth more than 85 billion euros, or $95 billion — that in recent weeks has kept Greek banks from collapsing.

“Analysts say that without these funds, Greek banks would not have sufficient money to provide to panicky savers if they opened on Monday. Without a continued flow of money to consumers and businesses, Greece’s struggling economy would probably lapse deeper into recession.”

U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew called IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde and the finance ministers of Germany and France, urging them to “find a solution that puts Greece on a path toward reform and recovery within the Eurozone,” according to a statement.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/28/418276486/greece-tries-to-stanch-bank-run-ahead-of-looming-default?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Kuwait Says Saudi Responsible For Mosque Suicide Bombing

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 29 2015

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People gather near flag-draped coffins of Kuwaiti Shiite victims from Friday’s suicide bombing at a mosque in the capital.

Khider Abbas/EPA/Landov


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People gather near flag-draped coffins of Kuwaiti Shiite victims from Friday's suicide bombing at a mosque in the capital.

People gather near flag-draped coffins of Kuwaiti Shiite victims from Friday’s suicide bombing at a mosque in the capital.

Khider Abbas/EPA/Landov

The suicide bomber who attacked a Shiite mosque in Kuwait last week, killing 27 people, was a Saudi national who flew into the neighboring Gulf nation hours before carrying out his deadly mission, Kuwaiti officials say. The self-declared Islamic State later claimed responsibility for the attack.

The Associated Press reports that Kuwaiti police have started making arrests in connection with the bombing during Friday midday prayers at the Imam Sadiq Mosque in Kuwait City.

The AP reports:

“The Interior Ministry named the bomber as Fahad Suleiman Abdulmohsen al-Gabbaa and said he was born in 1992, making him 22 or 23 years old. It said in a statement carried by the official Kuwait News Agency that he arrived on a flight to Kuwait International Airport at dawn Friday.

“Authorities also said they arrested a 25-year-old from Kuwait’s ‘bidoon’ — or desert nomad — community, identified as Abdulrahman Sabah Eidan Saud, who they say drove the car that brought the bomber to the mosque.”

The Interior Ministry described Abdulrahman as a follower of “fundamentalist and deviant ideology.”

Reuters says:

“Officials said the bombing was clearly meant to stir enmity between majority Sunnis and minority Shiites and harm the comparatively harmonious ties between the sects in Kuwait.

“Shiites are between 15 and 30 percent of the population of Kuwait, a mostly Sunni country where members of both communities live side by side with little apparent friction.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/28/418279847/kuwait-fingers-saudi-in-mosque-suicide-bombing?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

For Americans Seeking Affordable Degrees, German Schools Beckon

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 29 2015

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Berlin’s Humboldt University — named for its founder, the 19th century philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt, and his brother, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, pictured here — is one of several German universities attracting U.S. students. More than 4,000 Americans are studying in German universities.

Markus Schreiber/AP


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Markus Schreiber/AP

Berlin's Humboldt University  named for its founder, the 19th century philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt, and his brother, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, pictured here  is one of several German universities attracting U.S. students. More than 4,000 Americans are studying in German universities.

Berlin’s Humboldt University — named for its founder, the 19th century philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt, and his brother, naturalist Alexander von Humboldt, pictured here — is one of several German universities attracting U.S. students. More than 4,000 Americans are studying in German universities.

Markus Schreiber/AP

Looking to escape the staggering costs of a university education in the United States? You are not alone. And German education officials say a growing number of Americans are heading to the land of beer and bratwurst to get one.

At last count, there were 4,300 Americans studying at German universities, with more than half pursuing degrees, says Ulrich Grothus, deputy secretary general of the German Academic Exchange Service.

“We’ve seen an overall increase in international students in this country over the last 10 years, but the increase for Americans has been much faster,” he says. Between 2003 and 2013, he says, the number increased by 56 percent.

The fact that many programs are taught in English and tuition is usually free has helped make Germany the third most popular destination for American students studying abroad. Only the United Kingdom and Canada are more popular.

Also appealing is the high quality of German education. This year’s reputation rankings in the London-based Times Higher Education magazine placed three German universities in the top 50 of approximately 20,000 higher education institutions worldwide.

One of those three is Humboldt University in Berlin, where Casey Detrow is a student. The 27-year-old New Yorker, who graduated from the Macaulay Honors College at CUNY, is pursuing a master’s degree in American Studies at Humboldt.

“[It] offers me every bit of the academic challenge and intellectual stimulation that any top university in the U.S. would offer,” Detrow says. She chose Humboldt over six American programs that accepted her over the past three years, including ones at Columbia and Berkeley.

“I just have time and space in Berlin that I really think I wouldn’t have access to if I were living in the Bay Area, New York, Philadelphia, Chicago,” Detrow explains. “I have an affordable lifestyle and, you know, I have a room of my own. I have time and space to sit in my little apartment and kind of exhale and read and study.”

Detrow lives in a small, rent-controlled apartment in the bohemian neighborhood of Friedrichshain, which she pays for — along with many of her living expenses — with a scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service.

As for tuition fees? Her program charges none.

“I really cannot even compare that to what I would be getting in the United States,” Detrow says. “When you are talking free versus $50,000, I feel like there is no contest. I can’t justify going back.”

Fellow Humboldt student Mari Jarris agrees. The 22-year-old Wesleyan University graduate from Shelburne, Vt., says she plans to defer an offer from a Ph.D. program at Princeton so she can finish her master’s degree in German literature in Berlin.

“I expected it to be a couple thousand of euros a semester or something for foreign students, but I was shocked to see that you just have to pay semester dues that every student pays and you end up getting more benefits than you are really paying for,” including a comprehensive public transit pass, Jarris says.

The student fee varies depending on the university, but is generally in the low hundreds of dollars.

Like Detrow, Jarris receives a scholarship to cover her living expenses and rent in the trendy Kreuzberg neighborhood, but pays no tuition fees.

So why is Germany so generous when it comes to higher education?

For one thing, with an aging population and a shortage of skilled workers, Germany is eager to attract qualified young people from other countries who might want to settle there.

For another, many Germans oppose tuition fees as unjust. While a court ruling in 2005 led the 16 state governments that control and finance higher education to start charging students, a public backlash eventually led them to throw tuition fees out.

Some universities, however, continue to charge modest amounts for certain programs.

There are also direct benefits to German state coffers, Grothus says. “If only 30 percent of graduates stay for at least five years, they would pay within these five years — even while they are studying — more taxes than the taxpayer pays for their education.”

Detrow says she would like to stay in Germany and teach once she’s finished with her graduate and postgraduate degrees. But she may find the German job market less welcoming to foreigners than the education system.

A June study by the Expert Council of German Foundations on Integration and Migration found that three in 10 foreign graduates spent more than a year looking for employment. One in 10 found no jobs at all.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2015/06/28/418262031/for-americans-seeking-affordable-degrees-german-schools-beckon?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

Police Question Suspect In Lyon Factory Beheading

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 28 2015

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The Air Products industrial gas factory in Saint-Quentin Fallavier, France, shown on Saturday, a day after the attack.

Marius Becker/DPA/Landov


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The Air Products industrial gas factory in Saint-Quentin Fallavier, France, shown on Saturday, a day after the attack.

The Air Products industrial gas factory in Saint-Quentin Fallavier, France, shown on Saturday, a day after the attack.

Marius Becker/DPA/Landov

Police in France are questioning a suspect they believe was responsible for an explosion and the beheading of a man at a factory near Lyon on Friday. Officials reportedly say he took a “selfie” with the slain victim — his boss at the plant — and sent it to an unidentified Canadian mobile phone number.

The suspect, Yassine Salhi, 35, is a truck driver “with a history of radical Islamic ties,” according to Reuters. Authorities believe he caused an explosion by ramming his vehicle into an area at the plant containing flammable chemicals. He then allegedly placed his employer’s severed head on the factory gate along with Arabic inscriptions, Reuters says.

The factory is owned by Air Products, an American company headquartered in Pennsylvania.

Meanwhile, French investigators were trying to pin down the identity of the recipient of the photo sent by phone. Reuters quotes unnamed security officials as saying they believe it to be “an unspecified person now in Syria.”

The BBC says that Salhi was arrested at the Air Products factory in Lyon on Friday morning:

“Later, anti-terror police searched the apartment of Mr Salhi, a father-of-three, in the Moines neighbourhood of the town.

“They took his wife and sister into custody. Another man was arrested but released without charge.

“Agnes Thibault-Lecuivre, spokeswoman for the Paris prosecutor’s office, has said police have so far not found any motive or possible foreign connection, and that Mr Salhi is not speaking to investigators.”

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/27/418093847/police-question-suspect-in-lyon-factory-beheading-attack?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

After Tunisia Attack, Tourists Leave — And Locals Worry

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 28 2015

The self-declared Islamic State claimed responsibility for Friday’s attack, which killed 38 people at a beach resort in Tunisia. Most of the victims were foreigners, many of them British tourists.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/06/27/418098743/after-tunisia-attack-tourists-leave-and-locals-worry?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

No Easy Answers At Nairobi Summit On Countering Extremism

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 28 2015

Researchers at the international meeting shared some surprising responses from militants who were surveyed about their motivations for embracing terrorism.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2015/06/27/418098750/no-easy-answers-at-nairobi-summit-on-countering-extremism?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world

ISIS Claims Responsibility For Suicide Attack At Kuwait Mosque

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Jun 27 2015

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Kuwaiti Information Minister Sheikh Salman al-Humoud al-Sabah (center) consoles worshipers outside the Imam Sadiq Mosque after a suicide bomb attack following Friday prayers.

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Reuters/Landov

Kuwaiti Information Minister Sheikh Salman al-Humoud al-Sabah (center) consoles worshipers outside the Imam Sadiq Mosque after a suicide bomb attack following Friday prayers.

Kuwaiti Information Minister Sheikh Salman al-Humoud al-Sabah (center) consoles worshipers outside the Imam Sadiq Mosque after a suicide bomb attack following Friday prayers.

Reuters/Landov

At least 10 people are dead at a mosque in the Kuwaiti capital after an attack carried out by a suicide bomber wearing an explosive belt. The self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility.

The explosion at the Imam Sadiq Mosque in a residential and shopping district of Kuwait City occurred after Friday prayers, according to The Associated Press.

Reuters quotes the governor of Kuwait City, Thabet al-Muhanna, as saying more than 10 people were killed in the attack on the Shiite mosque.

An affiliate of the Islamic State, known as Najd Province, claimed responsibility for the attack on social media sites.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/26/417708840/isis-claims-responsibility-for-suicide-attack-at-kuwait-mosque?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=world