Are Democrats Trying To Energize The Base With The Race Card?

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 19 2014

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hide captionAttorney General Eric Holder (right) recently expressed outrage at the treatment President Obama and he have received from conservatives. He stopped just short of saying it was race-related, leaving that for the African-American audience at the recent National Action Network convention to decide.


Seth Wenig/AP

Attorney General Eric Holder (right) recently expressed outrage at the treatment President Obama and he have received from conservatives. He stopped just short of saying it was race-related, leaving that for the African-American audience at the recent National Action Network convention to decide.

Attorney General Eric Holder (right) recently expressed outrage at the treatment President Obama and he have received from conservatives. He stopped just short of saying it was race-related, leaving that for the African-American audience at the recent National Action Network convention to decide.

Seth Wenig/AP

Few mixtures in American life are more emotionally combustible than the one formed by the combination of politics and race.

That helps explain why Democrats, in general, and President Obama, in particular, have tended to steer clear of overtly raising race as an issue to explain some of the opposition to Obama’s presidency and agenda.

There seems to be a shift in recent days, however.

Top Democratic party officials have either directly or indirectly blamed race for some of the hostility to Obama, his policies, or both.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi, the House Democratic leader from California, and New York Rep. Steve Israel, who heads the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, both cited racism, pure and simple, among some Republicans as explanations for the House GOP’s resistance to legislation that would comprehensively overhaul the nation’s immigration laws.

Meanwhile, Attorney General Eric Holder took a slightly subtler approach. Speaking to the National Action Network, the largely African-American civil rights group founded by the Rev. Al Sharpton, Holder suggested some Republicans had a racial animus toward the president and himself.

“The last five years have been defined by significant strides and by lasting reforms even in the face, even in the face of unprecedented, unwarranted, ugly and divisive adversity,” Holder said.

“If you don’t believe that, you look at the way — forget about me, forget about me — you look at the way the attorney general of the United States was treated yesterday by a House committee. It had nothing to do with me, forget about that. What attorney general has ever had to deal with that kind of treatment? What president has ever had to deal with that kind of treatment?”

All of this has led to accusations that Holder, Pelosi and Israel are themselves guilty of playing the race card.

The attorney general later pointedly stated that he never explicitly said race explained the political right’s treatment of him or the president. Instead, he said his complaint was about Washington’s growing incivility.

What Holder demonstrated is that just as those on the right can use dog whistle politics to motivate their base, those on the left can also send messages that are heard a certain way by theirs.

It’s a safe bet, for instance, that many African-Americans who heard or read Holder’s words didn’t doubt he was talking about race. And he did it without ever uttering the R-word like Pelosi and Israel.

Is this partly about activating minority voters during a midterm election year in which Democrats stand a good chance of losing the Senate if their voters don’t go to the polls in numbers? Could be.

When Obama has been on the ballot, minority voters, especially African-Americans, didn’t need much more motivation than that to vote. But a midterm election when he’s not on the ballot is different.

Social scientists who have studied voters have found that voter participation rises when voters are emotionally engaged.

For some voters, suggestions that some of the opposition to Obama and his policies is more than just honest disagreement — and is indeed racially based — could help do the trick.

The Democrats’ use of voting rights strikes the same chord. Voting rights and race have been so inextricably linked in the nation’s history, and in the African-American experience, that Obama can send a resonant message to many minority voters without ever explicitly mentioning race.

He did exactly that when he spoke to the same Sharpton group as Holder, a few days after the attorney general.

Obama portrayed Republican voter ID efforts as attempts to undo civil and voting rights protections enacted during the Johnson administration — protections won at the price of blood.

That those Johnson-era laws were needed to counter racist laws and practices that prevented blacks from voting, especially in the South, could go unsaid before an audience well-steeped in that racial history.

“You think about Brown v. Board of Education, and the Civil Rights Act, and the Voting Rights Act, and Freedom Summer,” Obama said. “And with those anniversaries, we have new reason to remember those who made it possible for us to be here.” He mentioned three civil rights workers who became famous after they were killed registering Mississippi blacks to vote.

“James Chaney and Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner believed so strongly that change was possible they were willing to lay down their lives for it,” Obama said. “The least you can do is take them up on the gift that they have given you. Go out there and vote. You can make a change. You do have the power.”

“People died so you can vote” is a powerful emotional appeal. Come November, we’ll see if it was powerful enough.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/itsallpolitics/2014/04/18/304571750/are-democrats-trying-to-energize-the-base-with-the-race-card?ft=1&f=1004

A Journey Of Pain And Beauty: On Becoming Transgender In India

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 19 2014

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hide captionAbhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: “I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly.”


Julie McCarthy/NPR

Abhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly.

Abhina Aher was born a boy biologically and is now a hijra, a member of an ancient transgender community in India. Of her painful physical and psychological transformation, Aher remembers now: “I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly.”

Julie McCarthy/NPR

The signs came early that Abhina Aher was different.

Born a boy biologically and given the male name Abhijit, Aher grew up in a middle-class neighborhood of Mumbai, India. The son of a single mother who nurtured a love of dance, Aher would watch enthralled as she performed.

“I used to wear the clothes that my mother used to wear — her jewelry, her makeup,” Aher, now 37, recalls. “That is something which used to extremely fascinate me.”

Draped in a bright sari, gold earrings and painted nails, Aher is, by outward appearance, a female, preferring to be addressed as a woman.

She has undertaken a long and arduous journey, rejecting her biological sex and opting to become a hijra — a member of an ancient transgender community in India, popularly referred to as eunuchs.

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hide captionAher dances during an event observing World AIDS Day in New Delhi on Dec. 2, 2012. Of the recent legal ruling, recognizing transgender Indians as a third gender, she says: “We have put a foot inside a door, which is a door of hope, and we will open it — very, very soon.”


Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images

Aher dances during an event observing World AIDS Day in New Delhi on Dec. 2, 2012. Of the recent legal ruling, recognizing transgender Indians as a third gender, she says: We have put a foot inside a door, which is a door of hope, and we will open it  very, very soon.

Aher dances during an event observing World AIDS Day in New Delhi on Dec. 2, 2012. Of the recent legal ruling, recognizing transgender Indians as a third gender, she says: “We have put a foot inside a door, which is a door of hope, and we will open it — very, very soon.”

Anna Zieminski/AFP/Getty Images

This week, India’s Supreme Court handed down a landmark ruling for hijras and other transgender Indians, by recognizing a third gender under the law that is neither male nor female. The sweeping decision redefines their rights and the state’s obligation to them as one of India’s most marginalized groups.

Aher has felt that marginalization from a young age.

With his mother working as a clerk in the state government, Aher was raised by a maid who indulged the fantasies of an only child, including a fascination with a mother’s jingling anklets.

“I was mesmerized by that. When I used to be at home, I used to have grand performances, calling all the neighbors and dancing in front of them and putting up a show exactly replicating what my mother is doing on the stage,” Aher remembers. “One fine day, she just found out, and she got really mad about it. I was asked to sit in front of a god and make a pledge that I would never do that again.”

‘A Huge Feeling Of Incompleteness’

Things grew more complicated as Aher grew more effeminate and became the object of abuse — dragged into the school library, stripped and taunted by older male students. Aher’s teacher was no source of comfort: She declared the tormentors were in the right.

“She said to me, ‘Your friends are doing this to you because you are behaving in an extremely feminine way and that’s what is an issue,’ ” Aher says.

To resolve the deepening complexities of the teenager’s sexual identity, a psychiatrist prescribed sitting “in a dark room” and taking two Tylenol.

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hide captionAher attends a national conference on HIV-AIDS in New Delhi on July 4, 2011. Unlike many other hijras, she holds a conventional job as a project manager with an HIV-AIDS group.


Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images

Aher attends a national conference on HIV-AIDS in New Delhi on July 4, 2011. Unlike many other hijras, she holds a conventional job as a project manager with an HIV-AIDS group.

Aher attends a national conference on HIV-AIDS in New Delhi on July 4, 2011. Unlike many other hijras, she holds a conventional job as a project manager with an HIV-AIDS group.

Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images

“Which we tried for some time — and my mother took me to a lot of saints and a lot of temples also to make sure that I came back to what I should be,” Aher says.

Aher was told to behave more “manly,” sever contact with girls who were a feminizing influence and wear male clothing. And Aher obliged so as not to bring shame on her mother.

“I had to do that for 10 to 15 years. I used to watch myself, how I walk, how I talk, how I behave, how I dressed, just to hide my sexuality, just to fit into the heterosexual world,” Aher says. “I finished my education … and started working as a software engineer. There was a huge feeling of incompleteness all the time — having something wrong with your body all the time, not being able to connect with your soul all the time.”

Confused about what was happening, Aher attempted suicide three times — and survived each attempt.

“I could not die,” Aher says. “And that was turning point in my life, because I thought that since I did not die, let me try to live now.”

The strains with Aher’s mother became so serious that while they lived under the same roof, the two did not speak for nine years.

All the while, Aher’s desire to change gender was growing.

“My urge to become a woman was getting stronger inside me,” she says.

Joining The Hijras

A sense of isolation drove Aher into the arms of a guru, or mentor, within a community of like-minded souls known as hijras, who dress up in saris and are enshrined in Indian literary epics. Regarded as auspicious, they are invited to bestow blessings at births and dance at weddings.

Today, hijras can also be aggressive, especially when not handed money as they wend their way through traffic, begging. Though visible in public, their world is often shrouded in secrecy.

“They like the mystique,” says Aher, adding that initiation into the hijra community is full of rituals.

First, a hijra‘s earnings go to the guru. Then there’s the physical transformation: As the male gender is cast off for the female, initiates cannot cut their hair or shave their faces. Traditional “pluckers” from the hijra community pluck all the hair from initiates’ faces. They then start going out in public as females.

Joining this group that traces its roots back to antiquity is not something to be taken lightly.

“It’s no joke,” Aher says solemnly.

It can be psychologically and physically traumatic; there’s body-altering hormone treatment, often followed by operations to reassign sexual organs.

And the changes are costly. Aher says a breast augmentation operation alone can cost about $1,000 — a considerable amount in India. Castration surgeries cost a similar amount. Aher says she became a sex worker to help finance her transformation.

The physical toll is high as well.

“After the castration, you cannot work for 1 1/2 month. It was not an easy task, it was a journey of pain,” Aher says now, with a laugh. “I just wanted to become a beautiful butterfly.”

Castration is a dangerous business, and Aher says many members of the hijra community don’t survive the procedure.

“It happens in a dingy room, 10 by 10 probably. Immediately after castration, within two hours, the hijra is told to leave that place, because it’s illegal,” Aher says. “The operations are normally done by quacks, and lots of hijras died because of that.”

The UNDP reports that in some Indian states, up to 40 percent of hijras are said to be infected with HIV as they resort to selling sex to survive. They have long been discriminated against in jobs, housing and education. Aher is one of the lucky ones; she is a full-time staff member of the the Indian HIV-AIDS Alliance. But she also recalls being turned away by 17 hotels while on a business trip in the Indian state of Kerala, one of the country’s most progressive.

‘A Door Of Hope’

This week’s Supreme Court ruling making a third gender for India’s transgender population is a milestone for this conservative country that still regards homosexuality as a criminal offense.

The colonial-era law makes gay sex a crime in India and is also used to threaten or extort money from hijras — under the same prohibition on any sexual activity that is not “procreative” in nature.

Next week, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on the British-era penal code.

Aher says the fight is not over.

“What we have done is we have put a foot inside a door, which is a door of hope, and we will open it — very, very soon,” she says.

But as well-established as the hijras may be, they are still regarded by many Indians with discomfort and derision. Ridding society of stigmas and superstitions will be the true test of the hijras’ hard-fought recognition.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2014/04/18/304548675/a-journey-of-pain-and-beauty-on-becoming-transgender-in-india?ft=1&f=1004

Captain Of Sunken SKorean Ferry, 2 Crew Arrested

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 19 2014

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hide captionSouth Korean rescue team boats sail around buoys which mark the area of a sunken ferry as they try to search passengers believed to have been trapped inside.


Lee Jin-man/AP

South Korean rescue team boats sail around buoys which mark the area of a sunken ferry as they try to search passengers believed to have been trapped inside.

South Korean rescue team boats sail around buoys which mark the area of a sunken ferry as they try to search passengers believed to have been trapped inside.

Lee Jin-man/AP

MOKPO, South Korea (AP) — The captain of the ferry that sank off South Korea, leaving more than 300 missing or dead, was arrested Saturday on suspicion of negligence and abandoning people in need. Two crew members also were taken into custody, including a rookie third mate who a prosecutor said was steering in challenging waters unfamiliar to her when the accident occurred.

The number of confirmed dead rose to 32 when three bodies were found in the murky water near the ferry, said coast guard spokesman Kim Jae-in. Divers know at least some bodies remain inside the vessel, but they have been unable to get inside.

The ferry’s captain, Lee Joon-seok, 68, was arrested along with one of the Sewol’s three helmsmen and the 25-year-old third mate, prosecutors said.

“I am sorry to the people of South Korea for causing a disturbance and I bow my head in apology to the families of the victims,” Lee told reporters Saturday morning as he left the Mokpo Branch of Gwangju District Court to be jailed. But he defended his much-criticized decision to wait about 30 minutes before ordering an evacuation.

“At the time, the current was very strong, the temperature of the ocean water was cold, and I thought that if people left the ferry without (proper) judgment, if they were not wearing a life jacket, and even if they were, they would drift away and face many other difficulties,” Lee said. “The rescue boats had not arrived yet, nor were there any civilian fishing ships or other boats nearby at that time.”

The Sewol sank off South Korea’s southern coast Wednesday with 476 people aboard, most of them students on holiday from a single high school. More than 270 people are still missing, and most are believed to be trapped inside the 6,852-ton vessel.

By the time the evacuation order was issued, the ship was listing at too steep an angle for many people to escape the tight hallways and stairs inside. Several survivors told The Associated Press that they never heard any evacuation order.

Divers fighting strong currents and rain have been unable to get inside the ferry. A civilian diver saw three bodies inside the ship Saturday but was unable to break the windows, said Kwon Yong-deok, a coast guard official. Hundreds of civilian, government and military divers were involved in the search Saturday.

Senior prosecutor Yang Jung-jin told reporters that the third mate was steering the ship Wednesday morning as it passed through an area with lots of islands clustered close together and fast currents. Investigators said the accident came at a point where the ship had to make a turn, and prosecutor Park Jae-eok said investigators were looking at whether the third mate ordered a turn so sharp that it caused the vessel to list.

Yang said the third mate has six months of experience, and hadn’t steered in the area before because another mate usually handles those duties. She took the wheel this time because heavy fog caused a departure delay, Yang said, adding that investigators do not know whether the ship was going faster than usual.

Helmsman Park Kyung-nam identified the third mate as Park Han-kyul. The helmsman who was arrested, 55-year-old Cho Joon-ki, spoke to reporters outside court and accepted some responsibility.

“There was a mistake on my part as well, but the steering had been turned much more than usual,” Cho said.

Lee has four decades of experience at sea. He had been captaining ferries for 10 years by the time he was interviewed by the Jeju Today website in 2004, and said he had sailed on ocean freighters for 20 years before that.

But he was not the Sewol’s main captain, and worked on the ship about 10 days a month, helmsman Oh Yong-seok said.

Lee was not on the bridge when the ship began to list. “I gave instructions on the route, then briefly went to the bedroom when it happened,” he told reporters.

According to the court, Lee faces five charges, including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law, and the two other crew members each face three related charges.

Lee was required by law to be on the bridge helping his crew when the ferry passed through tough-to-navigate areas, said Yang, the senior prosecutor.

Yang said Lee also abandoned people in need of help and rescue, saying, “The captain escaped before the passengers.” Video aired by Yonhap news agency showed Lee among the first people to reach the shore by rescue boat.

Yang said the two crew members arrested failed to reduce speed near the islands and failed to carry out necessary measures to save lives.

It’s not clear why the two crew members made the sharp turn, Yang said. He said prosecutors would continue to look into whether something other than the turn could have made the ferry sink, but he added that there were no strong waves that could have knocked down the ferry at the time.

Prosecutors will have 10 days to decide whether to indict the captain and crew, but can request a 10-day extension from the court.

The Sewol had left the northwestern port of Incheon on Tuesday on an overnight journey to the holiday island of Jeju in the south with 323 students from Danwon High School in Ansan among its passengers. It capsized within hours of the crew making a distress call to the shore a little before 9 a.m. Wednesday.

A transcript of a ship-to-shore radio exchange shows that an official at the Jeju Vessel Traffic Services Center recommended evacuation just five minutes after the Sewol’s distress call. But helmsman Oh told the AP that it took 30 minutes for the captain to give the evacuation order as the boat listed.

With only 174 known survivors and the chances of survival increasingly slim, it is shaping up to be one of South Korea’s worst disasters, made all the more heartbreaking by the likely loss of so many young people, aged 16 or 17. The country’s last major ferry disaster was in 1993, when 292 people were killed.

The last bit of the ferry that had been above water — the dark blue keel — disappeared below the surface Friday night. Navy divers attached underwater air bags to the ferry to prevent it from sinking deeper, the Defense Ministry said.

Three vessels with cranes arrived at the accident site to prepare to salvage the ferry, but they will not hoist the ship before getting approval from family members of those still believed inside because the lifting could endanger any survivors, said a coast guard officer, speaking on condition of anonymity, citing department rules.

Coast guard official Ko Myung-seok said 176 ships and 28 planes were mobilized to search the area around the sunken ship Saturday, and that more than 650 divers were trying to search the interior of the ship. The coast guard also said a thin layer of oil was visible near the area where the ferry sank; about two dozen vessels were summoned to contain the spill.

___

Klug reported from Seoul. Associated Press writers Hyung-jin Kim and Jung-yoon Choi in Seoul contributed to this report.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=304730056&ft=1&f=1004

Deal To Ease Ukraine Crisis Delays New Sanctions On Russia

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 18 2014

The agreement calls on all parties to refrain from violence, requires that illegally-armed groups disarm and that control of government buildings be returned to Ukrainian authorities.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/18/304329635/will-ukraine-and-russia-follow-through-on-steps-to-ease-tensions?ft=1&f=1004

Colombia Mourns Death Of Favorite Son: Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 18 2014

Nobel Prize-winning author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 87, died on Thursday. He made Colombia synonymous with literature, particularly the dreamlike, whimsical story-telling known as magical realism.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/18/304329700/colombia-mourns-death-of-favorite-son-gabriel-garcia-marquez?ft=1&f=1004

Many Sunken Ferry Victims Believed To Be Trapped Below Deck

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 18 2014

The rescue and recovery mission is continuing off the southern coast of South Korea after a ferry capsized earlier this week. More than 200 people are missing. Bad weather is hampering the efforts.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/18/304329721/many-sunken-ferry-victims-believed-to-be-trapped-below-deck?ft=1&f=1004

Beloved Dutch Priest Killed By Gunman In War-Torn Syrian City

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 17 2014

Last week marked another low-point in the Syrian civil war. A unidentified gunman assassinated a Dutch priest in the city of Homs. Father Frans van der Lugt had lived in Syria for nearly five decades.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/17/304041833/beloved-dutch-priest-killed-by-gunman-in-war-torn-syrian-city?ft=1&f=1004

Hundreds Still Missing After South Korean Ferry Capsizes

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 17 2014

Strong currents and rain are hampering rescuers in the search for more than 200 passengers missing after a ferry flipped onto its side and filled with water off the southern coast of South Korea.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/17/304041861/hundreds-still-missing-after-south-korean-ferry-capsizes?ft=1&f=1004

Geneva Talks Aim To Ease Tensions In Ukraine Crisis

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 17 2014

Secretary of State John Kerry is in Geneva to meet with his diplomatic counterparts from Russia, Ukraine and the European Union. They are trying to find a resolution to the crisis in Ukraine.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/17/304041868/geneva-talks-aim-to-ease-tensions-in-ukraine-crisis?ft=1&f=1004

South Korea Says Nearly 300 Missing In Ferry Disaster

Uncategorized | Posted by Israel Grossman Attorney
Apr 16 2014

Nearly 300 people were still missing Wednesday several hours after a ferry carrying 459, most of them high school students, sank in cold waters off South Korea’s southern coast, killing at least two and injuring seven, officials said.

There were fears, however, of a big jump in the death toll, as dozens of boats, helicopters and divers scrambled to rescue passengers who had been on the ferry traveling to the southern tourist island of Jeju. One passenger said he believed that many people were trapped inside the ferry when it sank.

The ferry sent a distress call at about 9 a.m. local time Wednesday after it began leaning to one side, according to the Ministry of Security and Public Administration. The government said about 95 percent of the ferry, whose passengers included 325 high school students on a school trip to the popular tourist island, was submerged.

Coast guard officers, speaking on condition of anonymity citing department rules, said at least two people died and 293 were unaccounted for, but gave no further details, including what might have caused the ferry to sink. Official estimates of the missing, dead and even the number of passengers on the ship varied wildly as the search went on. A government official had earlier said that more than 100 people were unaccounted for, but officials later boosted the number to 295 missing and then changed it to 293.

Media photos showed wet students, some without shoes, some wrapped in blankets, tended to by emergency workers. One student, Lim Hyung-min, told broadcaster YTN from a gym on a nearby island that he and other students jumped into the ocean wearing life jackets and then swam to a nearby rescue boat.

“As the ferry was shaking and tilting, we all tripped and bumped into each another,” Lim said, adding that some people were bleeding. Once he jumped, the ocean “was so cold. … I was hurrying, thinking that I wanted to live.”

The water temperature in the area was about 54 Fahrenheit, cold enough to cause signs of hypothermia after about 90 minutes or 2 hours, according to an emergency official who spoke on condition of anonymity citing department rules. Officials said mud on the ocean floor made underwater search operations difficult. The ship sank in waters several miles north of Byeongpung Island, which is near the mainland and about 290 miles from Seoul, according to the coast guard.

Local media earlier showed the mostly submerged ferry tilting dramatically as helicopters flew overhead and rescue vessels floated nearby.

Passenger Kim Seong-mok, speaking from a nearby island after his rescue, told YTN that he was “certain” that many people were trapped inside the ferry as water quickly rushed in and the severe tilt of the vessel kept them from reaching the exits. Some people urged those who couldn’t get out of the ferry to break windows.

Kim said that after having breakfast he felt the ferry tilt and then heard it crash into something. He said the ferry operator made an announcement asking that passengers wait and not move from their places. Kim said he didn’t hear any announcement telling passengers to escape.

The students are from a high school in Ansan city near Seoul and were on their way to Jeju island for a four-day trip, according to a relief team set up by Gyeonggi Province, which governs the city. The ferry left Incheon port, just west of Seoul, on Tuesday evening, according to the state-run Busan Regional Maritime Affairs Port Administration. The trip from Incheon to Jeju is usually about 14 hours, so the ferry was about three hours from its destination when it made the distress call.

At the high school, students were sent home and parents gathered for news about the ferry.

Park Ji-hee, a first-year student, said she saw about a dozen parents crying at the school entrance and many cars and taxis gathered at the gate as she left in the morning.

She said some students in her classroom began to cry as they saw the news on their handsets. Teachers tried to soothe them, saying that the students on the ferry would be fine.

Officials said dozens of navy and coast guard divers, more than eight government boats, 11 helicopters and eight private fishing boats were helping with rescue efforts.

Lee Gyeong-og, a vice minister for South Korea’s Public Administration and Security Ministry, had earlier said 14 were injured, but officials later changed the number to seven without elaborating.

Article source: http://www.npr.org/2014/04/16/303615513/2-dead-after-ferry-sinks-off-south-korean-coast?ft=1&f=1004